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Measurement and Determinants of Quality of Life of Older Adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Author

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  • Nam Xuan Vo

    (Mahidol University)

  • Trung Quang Vo

    (University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Ho Chi Minh City)

  • Somtip Watanapongvanich

    (Chulalongkorn University)

  • Nopphol Witvorapong

    (Chulalongkorn University)

Abstract

This study represents the first study using Vietnamese data that is based on the World Health Organization’s quality of life instrument—the older adults module (WHOQOL-OLD). With the instrument, the study measures quality of life of a sample of 442 older adults living in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, in 2015. It evaluates the instrument’s psychometric properties and identifies determinants of quality of life. The results suggest that the level of quality of life of older adults in Ho Chi Minh City was quite high, with the total transformed score (scaled between 0 and 100) of 76.62 ± 10.16. The Vietnamese version of the WHOQOL-OLD module shows internal consistency with a high overall Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient and high corrected item-total correlations, construct validity with a reasonable goodness of fit based on a six-factor Confirmatory Factor Analysis model, and content validity with statistically significant facet–facet and item-facet correlation coefficients. Using Ordinary Least Squares and Tobit models, quality of life of older adults in Ho Chi Minh City is found to be associated negatively with age, education, and the number of difficulties with activities of daily living, and associated positively with perceived income adequacy (i.e., whether an older person considered his/her income to be sufficient). The analyses suggest that interventions related to improvements of functional health and standard of living could enhance quality of life in old age in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Suggested Citation

  • Nam Xuan Vo & Trung Quang Vo & Somtip Watanapongvanich & Nopphol Witvorapong, 2019. "Measurement and Determinants of Quality of Life of Older Adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 1285-1303, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:142:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-018-1955-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-018-1955-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cristina Simões & Sofia Santos, 2014. "Cross-Cultural Adaptation, Validity and Reliability of the Escala Pessoal de Resultados," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(2), pages 1065-1077, November.
    2. Kaigang Li & Noy Kay & Nattiporn Nokkaew, 2009. "The Performance of the World Health Organization’s WHOQOL-BREF in Assessing the Quality of Life of Thai College Students," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 90(3), pages 489-501, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marta Pascual-Sáez & David Cantarero-Prieto & Carla Blázquez-Fernández, 2019. "Partner’s depression and quality of life among older Europeans," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(7), pages 1093-1101, September.
    2. Xin Xu & Yuan Zhao & Jianfang Zhou & Siyou Xia, 2022. "Quality-of-Life Evaluation among the Oldest-Old in China under the “Active Aging Framework”," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(8), pages 1-15, April.
    3. Xin Xu & Yuan Zhao & Siyou Xia & Panpan Cui & Wenmin Tang & Xiaoliang Hu & Bei Wu, 2022. "Quality of Life and Its Influencing Factors Among Centenarians in Nanjing, China: A Cross-Sectional Study," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 160(2), pages 735-755, April.
    4. Carla Blázquez-Fernández & David Cantarero-Prieto & Marta Pascual-Sáez, 2021. "Quality of Life, Health and the Great Recession in Spain: Why Older People Matter?," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 18(4), pages 1-8, February.

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