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Assessing labor market conditions: the level of activity and the speed of improvement

Author

Listed:
  • Craig S. Hakkio
  • Jonathan L. Willis

Abstract

To help assess labor market conditions, two measures are proposed that show that the pace of improvement has recently increased, but two more years of similar improvement are needed to return conditions to historical averages.

Suggested Citation

  • Craig S. Hakkio & Jonathan L. Willis, 2013. "Assessing labor market conditions: the level of activity and the speed of improvement," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue july18, pages 1-2, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:y:2013:i:july18
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    File URL: http://kansascityfed.org/publicat/research/macrobulletins/mb13Hakkio-Willis0718.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hess Chung & Bruce C. Fallick & Christopher J. Nekarda & David Ratner, 2014. "Assessing the Change in Labor Market Conditions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-109, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 17 Dec 2014.
    2. Albuquerque, Bruno & Baumann, Ursel, 2017. "Will US inflation awake from the dead? The role of slack and non-linearities in the Phillips curve," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 247-271.
    3. Jed Armstrong & Günes Kamber & Özer Karagedikli, 2016. "Developing a labour utilisation composite index for New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    4. Antonio M. Conti & Concetta Gigante, 2018. "Weakness in Italy’s core inflation and the Phillips curve: the role of labour and financial indicators," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 466, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Recessions;

    Statistics

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