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Variations in consumer sentiment across demographic groups

Author

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  • Leslie McGranahan
  • Maude Toussaint-Comeau

Abstract

Consumer sentiment is one of the many macroeconomic indicators tracked by policymakers and the public. The aggregate numbers in consumer sentiment indexes, such as the University of Michigan's Index of Consumer Sentiment, conceal a wealth of demographic-specific information. The authors' findings suggest that index disaggregation by group matters because consumer sentiment varies systematically by demographic group.

Suggested Citation

  • Leslie McGranahan & Maude Toussaint-Comeau, 2006. "Variations in consumer sentiment across demographic groups," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 19-38.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2006:i:qi:p:19-38:n:v.30no.1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wly:japmet:v:31:y:2016:i:7:p:1254-1275 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kajal Lahiri & Yongchen Zhao, 2016. "Determinants of Consumer Sentiment Over Business Cycles: Evidence from the US Surveys of Consumers," Journal of Business Cycle Research, Springer;Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys (CIRET), pages 187-215.
    3. Pfajfar, D. & Santoro, E., 2008. "Asymmetries in Inflation Expectation Formation Across Demographic Groups," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0824, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Kajal Lahiri & George Monokroussos & Yongchen Zhao, 2016. "Forecasting Consumption: the Role of Consumer Confidence in Real Time with many Predictors," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(7), pages 1254-1275, November.

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    Keywords

    Consumers ; Demography ; Wealth;

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