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Did quantitative easing by the Bank of Japan "work"?

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  • Mark M. Spiegel

Abstract

The success, or lack thereof, of the Bank of Japan's quantitative easing program is of interest not only as an important experience in Japanese economic history, but more generally as an unprecedented experiment in monetary policy under very low nominal interest rates. In this Economic Letter, I review the evidence that has emerged to date concerning the impact of the quantitative easing policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark M. Spiegel, 2006. "Did quantitative easing by the Bank of Japan "work"?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue oct20.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2006:i:oct20:n:2006-28
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kobayashi, Takeshi & Spiegel, Mark M. & Yamori, Nobuyoshi, 2006. "Quantitative easing and Japanese bank equity values," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 699-721, December.
    2. Baba, Naohiko & Nishioka, Shinichi & Oda, Nobuyuki & Shirakawa, Masaaki & Ueda, Kazuo & Ugai, Hiroshi, 2005. "Japan's Deflation, Problems in the Financial System, and Monetary Policy," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 23(1), pages 47-111, February.
    3. Alan J. Auerbach & Maurice Obstfeld, 2005. "The Case for Open-Market Purchases in a Liquidity Trap," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 110-137, March.
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    2. Bofinger, Peter & Franz, Wolfgang & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice & Wiegard, Wolfgang, 2010. "Chancen für einen stabilen Aufschwung. Jahresgutachten 2010/11," Annual Economic Reports / Jahresgutachten, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, volume 127, number 201011.
    3. Piotr Ciżkowicz & Andrzej Rzońca, 2014. "Interest Rates Close to Zero, Post-crisis Restructuring and Natural Interest Rate," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2014(3), pages 315-329.
    4. Albertazzi, Ugo & Barbiero, Francesca & Marqués-Ibáñez, David & Popov, Alexander & Rodriguez d’Acri, Costanza & Vlassopoulos, Thomas, 2020. "Monetary policy and bank stability: the analytical toolbox reviewed," Working Paper Series 2377, European Central Bank.
    5. Costas Karfakis & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2015. "The effects of global monetary policy and Greek debt crisis on the dynamic conditional correlations of currency markets," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 795-811, November.
    6. Costas Karfakis & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2014. "The effects of global monetary policy and Greek debt crisis on the dynamic conditional correlations of currency markets," Discussion Paper Series 2014_01, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Sep 2014.
    7. Meixing DAI & Moïse SIDIROPOULOS, 2009. "Money growth rule and macro-financial stability under inflation-targeting regime," Working Papers of BETA 2009-05, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.

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