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Did the Green Revolution Concentrate Incomes? A Quantitative Study of Research Reports

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  • Freebairn, Donald K.

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  • Freebairn, Donald K., 1995. "Did the Green Revolution Concentrate Incomes? A Quantitative Study of Research Reports," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 265-279, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:23:y:1995:i:2:p:265-279
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    1. Prahladachar, M., 1983. "Income distribution effects of the green revolution in India: A review of empirical evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 11(11), pages 927-944, November.
    2. John Perkins, 1990. "The Rockefeller Foundation and the green revolution, 1941–1956," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 7(3), pages 6-18, June.
    3. Randolf Barker & Mahar K. Mangahas, 1970. "Environmental and Other Factors Influencing the Performance of New High Yielding Varities of Wheat and Rice in Asia," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 197013, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    4. Cleaver, Harry M, Jr, 1972. "The Contradictions of the Green Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(2), pages 177-186, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hyman, Glenn & Fujisaka, Sam & Jones, Peter & Wood, Stanley & de Vicente, M. Carmen & Dixon, John, 2008. "Strategic approaches to targeting technology generation: Assessing the coincidence of poverty and drought-prone crop production," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 50-61, July.
    2. Hyman, Glenn & Larrea, Carlos & Farrow, Andrew, 2005. "Methods, results and policy implications of poverty and food security mapping assessments," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 453-460.
    3. Ding, Shijun & Meriluoto, Laura & Reed, W. Robert & Tao, Dayun & Wu, Haitao, 2011. "The impact of agricultural technology adoption on income inequality in rural China: Evidence from southern Yunnan Province," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 344-356, September.
    4. Fisher, Monica G. & Masters, William A. & Sidibe, Mamadou, 2001. "Technical change in Senegal's irrigated rice sector: impact assessment under uncertainty," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 24(2), January.
    5. B Kelsey Jack, "undated". "Market Inefficiencies and the Adoption of Agricultural Technologies in Developing Countries," CID Working Papers 50, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    6. Paul Mosley, 2002. "The African green revolution as a pro-poor policy instrument," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 695-724.
    7. Rahman, Sanzidur & Parkinson, R.J., 2007. "Productivity and soil fertility relationships in rice production systems, Bangladesh," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-3), pages 318-333, January.
    8. Shijun Ding & Laura Meriluoto & W. Robert Reed & Daoyun Tao & Haitao Wu, 2010. "The Impact of Agricultural Technology Adoption of Income Inequality in Rural China," Working Papers in Economics 10/41, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    9. Hazell, Peter B.R., 2009. "The Asian Green Revolution:," IFPRI discussion papers 911, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Tsubota, Kunio, 2002. "Views on Food Production: Towards a New Green Revolution," 13th Congress, Wageningen, The Netherlands, July 7-12, 2002 6987, International Farm Management Association.
    11. Tchale, Hardwick & Sauer, Johannes, 2008. "Soil Fertility Management And Maize Productivity In Malawi: Curvature Correct Efficiency Modeling And Simulation," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52077, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    12. Diana Suhardiman & Mark Giordano & Lilao Leebouapao & Oulavanh Keovilignavong, 2016. "Farmers’ strategies as building block for rethinking sustainable intensification," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(3), pages 563-574, September.
    13. Ramani, Shyama V. & Thutupalli, Ajay, 2015. "Emergence of controversy in technology transitions: Green Revolution and Bt cotton in India," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 198-212.
    14. Omilola, Babatunde, 2009. "Estimating the impact of agricultural technology on poverty reduction in rural Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 901, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Raitzer, David A. & Kelley, Timothy G., 2008. "Benefit-cost meta-analysis of investment in the International Agricultural Research Centers of the CGIAR," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 96(1-3), pages 108-123, March.
    16. Wiemers, Alice, 2015. "A “Time of Agric”: Rethinking the “Failure” of Agricultural Programs in 1970s Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 104-117.
    17. Christian Otchia, 2014. "Agricultural Modernization, Structural Change and Pro-poor Growth: Policy Options for the Democratic Republic of Congo," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 3(1), pages 1-43, December.
    18. Zhou, Yuan & Zhang, Yili & Abbaspour, Karim C. & Mosler, Hans-Joachim & Yang, Hong, 2009. "Economic impacts on farm households due to water reallocation in China's Chaobai watershed," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(5), pages 883-891, May.
    19. Paul Mosley & Abrar Suleiman, 2007. "Aid, Agriculture and Poverty in Developing Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 139-158, February.
    20. Patrick Webb, 2002. "Cultivated Capital: Agriculture, Food Systems and Sustainable Development," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 15, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
    21. Paul Mosley & Sanzidur Rahman, 1999. "Impact of technological change on income distribution and poverty in Bangladesh agriculture: an empirical analysis," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 935-955.

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