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Miles, speed, and technology: Traffic safety under oligopolistic insurance

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  • Dementyeva, Maria
  • Verhoef, Erik T.

Abstract

We study road safety when insurance companies have market power, and can influence drivers’ behavior via insurance premiums. We obtain first- and second-best premiums for different insurance market structures. The insurance program consists of an insurance premium, and marginal dependencies of that premium on speed and own safety technology choice of drivers. A private monopolist internalizes collision externalities up to the point where compensations to users’ benefit matches the full (intangible) costs; in oligopolistic markets, insurers do not fully internalize collision externalities. Analytical results demonstrate how insurance firms’ incentives to influence traffic safety coincide with or deviate from socially optimal incentives. Our results may be useful for design of pay-as-you-speed and alike insurances as well as policies related to driving safety.

Suggested Citation

  • Dementyeva, Maria & Verhoef, Erik T., 2016. "Miles, speed, and technology: Traffic safety under oligopolistic insurance," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 147-162.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transb:v:86:y:2016:i:c:p:147-162
    DOI: 10.1016/j.trb.2016.01.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lave, Charles A, 1985. "Speeding, Coordination, and the 55 MPH Limit," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1159-1164, December.
    2. Dementyeva, Maria & Koster, Paul R. & Verhoef, Erik T., 2015. "Regulation of road accident externalities when insurance companies have market power," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 1-8.
    3. Hultkrantz, Lars & Nilsson, Jan-Eric & Arvidsson, Sara, 2012. "Voluntary internalization of speeding externalities with vehicle insurance," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 926-937.
    4. Verhoef, Erik T. & Rouwendal, Jan, 2004. "A behavioural model of traffic congestion: Endogenizing speed choice, traffic safety and time losses," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 408-434, November.
    5. Ian W. H. Parry & Margaret Walls & Winston Harrington, 2007. "Automobile Externalities and Policies," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(2), pages 373-399, June.
    6. Olivier Gossner & Pierre Picard, 2005. "On the Consequences of Behavioral Adaptations in the Cost-Benefit Analysis of Road Safety Measures," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 72(4), pages 577-599.
    7. Alma Cohen & Liran Einav, 2003. "The Effects of Mandatory Seat Belt Laws on Driving Behavior and Traffic Fatalities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 828-843, November.
    8. Luis Rizzi, 2008. "Integrating Travel Delays, Road Safety, Care, Vehicle Insurance and Cost-Benefit Analysis of Road Capacity Expansion in a Unified Framework," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 125-140, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Road safety; Collision externality; Traffic regulation; Second-best; Car accident;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy

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