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Educational choice, endogenous inequality and economic development


  • Andergassen, Rainer
  • Nardini, Franco


This paper investigates the mechanics through which wealth may, in the long run, trickle down from the rich to the poor. In the presence of indivisibilities in investment of human capital and impossibility of borrowing money, investment in education is financed through an intergenerational transfer. In an OLG model where aggregate production requires capital and both skilled and unskilled labour, it is shown that the long run equilibrium outcome depends on the values of few key parameters. A complete characterisation of the steady state is provided. Under some configurations of the parameter values a unique invariant equilibrium exists where inequality vanishes asymptotically. Under others, multiple equilibria exist and the equilibrium outcome crucially depends on the initial conditions of the system. These equilibria are characterised by an negative relationship between inequality and economic development.
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  • Andergassen, Rainer & Nardini, Franco, 2007. "Educational choice, endogenous inequality and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 940-958, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:29:y:2007:i:4:p:940-958

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Freeman, Scott, 1996. "Equilibrium Income Inequality among Identical Agents," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 1047-1064, October.
    9. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-1458, December.
    10. Dilip Mookherjee & Debraj Ray, 2002. "Is Equality Stable?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 253-259, May.
    11. Thomas Piketty, 1997. "The Dynamics of the Wealth Distribution and the Interest Rate with Credit Rationing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(2), pages 173-189.
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