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Limited commitment and the legal restrictions theory of the demand for money

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  • Ferraris, Leo
  • Mattesini, Fabrizio

Abstract

This paper addresses the “rate of return” puzzle of monetary theory. Similarly to the legal restrictions theory of the demand for money, we assume that Government bonds are subject to a minimum purchase requirement. Differently from this theory, however, we assume that intermediaries, when issuing private notes, cannot commit to always redeem them. First, we study an environment with legal restrictions to intermediation and show that cash and interest bearing bonds both circulate in the economy. Then, we drop the legal restrictions and show that also with active intermediation, under limited commitment, there is an equilibrium with rate of return dominance. A positive interest rate provides the intermediaries with the incentive to issue and redeem their notes.

Suggested Citation

  • Ferraris, Leo & Mattesini, Fabrizio, 2014. "Limited commitment and the legal restrictions theory of the demand for money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 196-215.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:151:y:2014:i:c:p:196-215
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2013.12.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rao Aiyagari, S. & Wallace, Neil & Wright, Randall, 1996. "Coexistence of money and interest-bearing securities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 397-419, June.
    2. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2005. "A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 463-484, June.
    3. Neil Wallace, 1983. "A legal restrictions theory of the demand for \\"money\\" and the role of monetary policy," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, vol. 7(Win).
    4. David Andolfatto, 2005. "On the Coexistence of Money and Bonds," Macroeconomics 0502020, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. John Bryant & Neil Wallace, 1980. "A suggestion for further simplifying the theory of money," Staff Report 62, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    6. John Kareken & Neil Wallace, 1981. "On the Indeterminacy of Equilibrium Exchange Rates," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 96(2), pages 207-222.
    7. Zhu, Tao & Wallace, Neil, 2007. "Pairwise trade and coexistence of money and higher-return assets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 524-535, March.
    8. Sargent, Thomas J & Wallace, Neil, 1982. "The Real-Bills Doctrine versus the Quantity Theory: A Reconsideration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1212-1236, December.
    9. Chao Gu & Fabrizio Mattesini & Randall Wright, 2013. "Banking: A New Monetarist Approach," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 636-662.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rojas Breu, Mariana, 2017. "Debt enforcement and the value of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 237-251.
    2. Luis Araujo & Leo Ferraris, 2019. "The Societal Benefits of Money and Interest Bearing Debt," CEIS Research Paper 453, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 19 Feb 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money; Government bonds; Rate of return dominance; Legal restrictions;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General

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