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The fiscal crisis in the health sector: Patterns of cutback management across Europe

Author

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  • Ongaro, Edoardo
  • Ferré, Francesca
  • Fattore, Giovanni

Abstract

The article investigates trends in health sector cutback management strategies occurred during the ongoing financial and fiscal crisis across Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Ongaro, Edoardo & Ferré, Francesca & Fattore, Giovanni, 2015. "The fiscal crisis in the health sector: Patterns of cutback management across Europe," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(7), pages 954-963.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:119:y:2015:i:7:p:954-963
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2015.04.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lehto, Juhani & Vrangbæk, Karsten & Winblad, Ulrika, 2015. "The reactions to macro-economic crises in Nordic health system policies: Denmark, Finland and Sweden, 1980–2013," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 61-81, January.
    2. Or, Zeynep & Cases, Chantal & Lisac, Melanie & Vrangbæk, Karsten & Winblad, Ulrika & Bevan, Gwyn, 2010. "Are health problems systemic? Politics of access and choice under Beveridge and Bismarck systems," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 269-293, July.
    3. Ian Thynne, 2011. "Symposium Introduction: The Global Financial Crisis, Governance and Institutional Dynamics," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12, March.
    4. J. Schreyögg & T. Stargardt & M. Velasco-Garrido & R. Busse, 2005. "Defining the “Health Benefit Basket” in nine European countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 6(1), pages 2-10, November.
    5. Christopher Pollitt, 2010. "Cuts and reforms — Public services as we move into a new era," Society and Economy, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 32(1), pages 17-31, June.
    6. B. Peters & Jon Pierre & Tiina Randma-Liiv, 2011. "Global Financial Crisis, Public Administration and Governance: Do New Problems Require New Solutions?," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 13-27, March.
    7. Conor Keegan & Steve Thomas & Charles Normand & Conceição Portela, 2013. "Measuring recession severity and its impact on healthcare expenditure," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 139-155, June.
    8. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, April.
    9. Walter Kickert, 2012. "State Responses to the Fiscal Crisis in Britain, Germany and the Netherlands," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 299-309, March.
    10. Walter Kickert, 2012. "State responses to the fiscal crisis: Belgium," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 303-310, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Signorelli, C. & Odone, A. & Oradini-Alacreu, A. & Pelissero, G., 2020. "Universal Health Coverage in Italy: lights and shades of the Italian National Health Service which celebrated its 40th anniversary," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 69-74.
    2. Noto, Guido & Belardi, Paolo & Vainieri, Milena, 2020. "Unintended consequences of expenditure targets on resource allocation in health systems," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 124(4), pages 462-469.
    3. Liang, Li-Lin & Tussing, A. Dale, 2019. "The cyclicality of government health expenditure and its effects on population health," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 96-103.

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