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On the unimportance of machinery

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  • James Field, Alexander

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  • James Field, Alexander, 1985. "On the unimportance of machinery," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 378-401, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:22:y:1985:i:4:p:378-401
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    Cited by:

    1. Scott, Peter, 2001. "Path Dependence and Britain's "Coal Wagon Problem"," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 366-385, July.
    2. Gert Wagner, "undated". "Trabajo, Producción y Crecimiento, la Economía Chilena 1860-1930," Documentos de Trabajo 150, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    3. Broadberry, S. N., 1995. "Comparative productivity levels in manufacturing since the Industrial Revolution: Lessons from Britain, America, Germany and Japan," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 71-95, March.
    4. Broadberry, Stephen N. & Irwin, Douglas A., 2006. "Labor productivity in the United States and the United Kingdom during the nineteenth century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 257-279, April.
    5. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-141 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Stefano Fenoaltea, 2017. "The Fruits of Disaggregation: the Engineering Industry, Tariff Protection, and the Industrial Investment Cycle in Italy, 1861-1913," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 41, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    7. Field, Alexander J., 2007. "The equipment hypothesis and US economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 43-58, January.
    8. Stephen N. Broadberry & Douglas A. Irwin, 2004. "Labor Productivity in Britain and America During the Nineteenth Century," NBER Working Papers 10364, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Lindmark, Magnus & Andersson, Lars Fredrik, 2014. "Where Was the Wealth of the Nation? Measuring Swedish Capital for the 19th and 20th Centuries," CERE Working Papers 2014:1, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics.
    10. Joost Veenstra & Herman Jong, 2016. "A Tale of Two Tails: Establishment Size and Labour Productivity in United States and German Manufacturing at the Start of the Twentieth Century," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(2), pages 198-220, July.

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