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Energy consumption by industrial processes in the European Union

Author

Listed:
  • Worrell, E.
  • Cuelenaere, R.F.A.
  • Blok, K.
  • Turkenburg, W.C.

Abstract

Industrial energy consumption in the European Union has been studied, the focus being on specific energy consumption of various industrial sectors. An analysis is made of the main structural factors (e.g., primary or secondary production, product types) that affect energy efficiency. The industrial sub-sectors and production processes considered are those that are most important from an energy point of view, namely, oil refining, petrochemicals, ammonia, paper, cement, and steel production. These sectors consume 18% of the primary energy in the EU. There are considerable differences between the energy efficiencies of industries in EU member states. If each sector were to apply “best practice technology”, then potential improvements in energy efficiency in the EU would be on average 15 ± 4% for oil refining, 21 ± 2% for ammonia, 25 ± 5% for paper, 13 ± 1% for cement, and 27 ± 3% for steel. No analysis can be made of possible improvements in the energy efficiency in the petrochemical industry because insufficient statistics are available. An improvement in the quality of international statistics is necessary to produce more reliable assessments.

Suggested Citation

  • Worrell, E. & Cuelenaere, R.F.A. & Blok, K. & Turkenburg, W.C., 1994. "Energy consumption by industrial processes in the European Union," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 19(11), pages 1113-1129.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:19:y:1994:i:11:p:1113-1129
    DOI: 10.1016/0360-5442(94)90068-X
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Groenenberg, Heleen & Phylipsen, Dian & Blok, Kornelis, 2001. "Differentiating commitments world wide: global differentiation of GHG emissions reductions based on the Triptych approach--a preliminary assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(12), pages 1007-1030, October.
    2. Azadeh, A. & Amalnick, M.S. & Ghaderi, S.F. & Asadzadeh, S.M., 2007. "An integrated DEA PCA numerical taxonomy approach for energy efficiency assessment and consumption optimization in energy intensive manufacturing sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 3792-3806, July.
    3. Groenenberg, Heleen & Blok, Kornelis & van der Sluijs, Jeroen, 2005. "Projection of energy-intensive material production for bottom-up scenario building," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 75-99, April.
    4. Neelis, M.L. & Pouwelse, J.W., 2008. "Towards consistent and reliable Dutch and international energy statistics for the chemical industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 2719-2733, July.
    5. Phylipsen, G. J. M. & Blok, K. & Worrell, E., 1997. "International comparisons of energy efficiency-Methodologies for the manufacturing industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7-9), pages 715-725.
    6. Ramírez, C.A. & Patel, M. & Blok, K., 2005. "The non-energy intensive manufacturing sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 749-767.
    7. Borjesson, Pal & Gustavsson, Leif, 2000. "Greenhouse gas balances in building construction: wood versus concrete from life-cycle and forest land-use perspectives," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 575-588, July.
    8. Murtishaw, Scott & Schipper, Lee & Unander, Fridtjof & Karbuz, Sohbet & Khrushch, Marta, 2001. "Lost carbon emissions: the role of non-manufacturing "other industries" and refining in industrial energy use and carbon emissions in IEA countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 83-102, January.
    9. Hammond, G.P. & Norman, J.B., 2012. "Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 220-227.
    10. Farla, Jacco & Blok, Kornelis & Schipper, Lee, 1997. "Energy efficiency developments in the pulp and paper industry : A cross-country comparison using physical production data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7-9), pages 745-758.
    11. Akvile Lawrence & Patrik Thollander & Mariana Andrei & Magnus Karlsson, 2019. "Specific Energy Consumption/Use (SEC) in Energy Management for Improving Energy Efficiency in Industry: Meaning, Usage and Differences," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(2), pages 1-22, January.
    12. Phylipsen, G J M & Bode, J W & Blok, K & Merkus, H & Metz, B, 1998. "A Triptych sectoral approach to burden differentiation; GHG emissions in the European bubble," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(12), pages 929-943, October.
    13. Rafiqul, Islam & Weber, Christoph & Lehmann, Bianca & Voss, Alfred, 2005. "Energy efficiency improvements in ammonia production—perspectives and uncertainties," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(13), pages 2487-2504.
    14. Miner, R & Upton, B, 2002. "Methods for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from lime kilns at kraft pulp mills," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 729-738.
    15. Saygin, D. & Worrell, E. & Patel, M.K. & Gielen, D.J., 2011. "Benchmarking the energy use of energy-intensive industries in industrialized and in developing countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 6661-6673.
    16. Phylipsen, Dian & Blok, Kornelis & Worrell, Ernst & Beer, Jeroen de, 2002. "Benchmarking the energy efficiency of Dutch industry: an assessment of the expected effect on energy consumption and CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(8), pages 663-679, June.

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