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Harmonization of renewable electricity feed-in laws: A comment

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  • Söderholm, Patrik

Abstract

This comment aims at critically analyzing some of the economic efficiency issues that are raised in the paper by Muñoz et al. [2007. Harmonization of renewable electricity feed-in laws in the European Union. Energy Policy 35, 3104-3114] on the harmonization of feed-in law schemes for renewable electricity in the European Union. We comment on the choice between green certificate systems and feed-in laws, but pay particular attention to the implementation and design of a harmonized feed-in law scheme. In the comment we argue first that the approach suggested by Muñoz et al. tends to downplay many of the practical difficulties in assessing the real costs facing investors in renewable electricity, not the least since the presence of regulatory uncertainty about the marginal costs of renewable electricity may be essential for the choice between different support systems. Concerning the benefit side of renewable electricity promotion, the Muñoz et al. (2007) paper builds on an interpretation of the EU Renewables Directive that provides plenty of room for national priorities and that therefore essentially implies that harmonized support premiums per se are of little value. We argue instead that a harmonized system should primarily address the international spillover effects from renewable electricity promotion, not the least those related to improved security of supply in Europe. There exists then a strong case for disregarding the specific national benefits of renewable electricity production in the design of harmonized support systems, and for instead considering international--perhaps at the start bilateral--policy support coordination based on entirely uniform support levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "Harmonization of renewable electricity feed-in laws: A comment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 946-953, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:36:y:2008:i:3:p:946-953
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin L. Weitzman, 1974. "Prices vs. Quantities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(4), pages 477-491.
    2. Rowlands, Ian H., 2005. "The European directive on renewable electricity: conflicts and compromises," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 965-974, May.
    3. Midttun, Atle & Koefoed, Anne Louise, 2003. "Greening of electricity in Europe: challenges and developments," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 677-687, June.
    4. Munoz, Miquel & Oschmann, Volker & David Tabara, J., 2007. "Harmonization of renewable electricity feed-in laws in the European Union," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 3104-3114, May.
    5. Lauber, Volkmar, 2004. "REFIT and RPS: options for a harmonised Community framework," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 1405-1414, August.
    6. del Rio, Pablo, 2005. "A European-wide harmonised tradable green certificate scheme for renewable electricity: is it really so beneficial?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1239-1250, July.
    7. Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "The political economy of international green certificate markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2051-2062, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Friebe, Christian A. & von Flotow, Paschen & Täube, Florian A., 2014. "Exploring technology diffusion in emerging markets – the role of public policy for wind energy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 217-226.
    2. Paul Lehmann & Felix Creutzig & Melf-Hinrich Ehlers & Nele Friedrichsen & Clemens Heuson & Lion Hirth & Robert Pietzcker, 2012. "Carbon Lock-Out: Advancing Renewable Energy Policy in Europe," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 1-32, February.
    3. Sebastian Strunz, Erik Gawel, and Paul Lehmann, 2015. "Towards a general Europeanization of EU Member States energy policies?," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    4. Dinica, Valentina, 2008. "Initiating a sustained diffusion of wind power: The role of public-private partnerships in Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3562-3571, September.
    5. Fürsch, Michaela & Lindenberger, Dietmar, 2013. "Promotion of Electricity from Renewable Energy in Europe post 2020 - the Economic Benefits of Cooperation," EWI Working Papers 2013-16, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).
    6. Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "The political economy of international green certificate markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2051-2062, June.
    7. Strunz, Sebastian & Gawel, Erik & Lehmann, Paul & Söderholm, Patrik, 2015. "Policy convergence: A conceptual framework based on lessons from renewable energy policies in the EU," UFZ Discussion Papers 14/2015, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).

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