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A combined input-output and sensitivity analysis approach to analyse sector linkages and CO2 emissions

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  • Tarancon Moran, Miguel Angel
  • del Rio Gonzalez, Pablo

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  • Tarancon Moran, Miguel Angel & del Rio Gonzalez, Pablo, 2007. "A combined input-output and sensitivity analysis approach to analyse sector linkages and CO2 emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 578-597, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:29:y:2007:i:3:p:578-597
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Labandeira, Xavier & Labeaga, Jose M., 2002. "Estimation and control of Spanish energy-related CO2 emissions: an input-output approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 597-611, June.
    2. Machado, Giovani & Schaeffer, Roberto & Worrell, Ernst, 2001. "Energy and carbon embodied in the international trade of Brazil: an input-output approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 409-424, December.
    3. Chang, Yih F & Lin, Sue J, 1998. "Structural decomposition of industrial CO2 emission in Taiwan: an input-output approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 5-12, January.
    4. Ferng, Jiun-Jiun, 2003. "Allocating the responsibility of CO2 over-emissions from the perspectives of benefit principle and ecological deficit," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 121-141, August.
    5. Lenzen, Manfred, 1998. "Primary energy and greenhouse gases embodied in Australian final consumption: an input-output analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 495-506, May.
    6. Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 1998. "Structural Decomposition Techniques: Sense and Sensitivity," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 307-324.
    7. Alcantara, Vicent & Duarte, Rosa, 2004. "Comparison of energy intensities in European Union countries. Results of a structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 177-189, January.
    8. Luukkanen, Jyrki & Kaivo-oja, Jari, 2002. "ASEAN tigers and sustainability of energy use--decomposition analysis of energy and CO2 efficiency dynamics," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 281-292, March.
    9. Kaivo-oja, Jari & Luukkanen, Jyrki, 2004. "The European Union balancing between CO2 reduction commitments and growth policies: decomposition analyses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(13), pages 1511-1530, September.
    10. Graham Treloar, 1997. "Extracting Embodied Energy Paths from Input-Output Tables: Towards an Input-Output-based Hybrid Energy Analysis Method," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 375-391.
    11. Alex Hoen & Machiel Mulder, 2003. "Explaining Dutch emissions of CO2; a decomposition analysis," CPB Discussion Paper 24, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    12. Mongelli, I. & Tassielli, G. & Notarnicola, B., 2006. "Global warming agreements, international trade and energy/carbon embodiments: an input-output approach to the Italian case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 88-100, January.
    13. Alcantara, Vicent & Padilla, Emilio, 2003. ""Key" sectors in final energy consumption: an input-output application to the Spanish case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(15), pages 1673-1678, December.
    14. Mark De Haan, 2001. "A Structural Decomposition Analysis of Pollution in the Netherlands," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 181-196.
    15. Munksgaard, Jesper & Pedersen, Klaus Alsted, 2001. "CO2 accounts for open economies: producer or consumer responsibility?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 327-334, March.
    16. J. W. Sun, 1999. "Decomposition of Aggregate CO2 Emissions in the OECD: 1960-1995," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 147-155.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alcántara, Vicent & del Río, Pablo & Hernández, Félix, 2010. "Structural analysis of electricity consumption by productive sectors. The Spanish case," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 2088-2098.
    2. Othman, Jamal & Jafari, Yaghoob, 2013. "Identification of the key sectors producing CO2 emissions in Malaysia: application of Input–Output analysis," MPRA Paper 65192, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Aug 2014.
    3. Stanislav Edward Shmelev (ODID), "undated". "Environmentally Extended Input-Output Analysis of the UK Economy: Key Sector Analysis," QEH Working Papers qehwps183, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    4. Minihan, Erin S. & Wu, Ziping, 2011. "The Potential Economic and Environmental Costs of GHG Mitigation Measures for Cattle Sectors in Northern Ireland," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108779, Agricultural Economics Society.

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