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Public deficits and economic growth

Author

Listed:
  • Afonso, Oscar
  • Alves, Rui Henrique
  • Vasconcelos, Paulo B.

Abstract

Considering an integrated area, this paper deals with the balance between the positive effects in the degree of economic cohesion resulting from R&D subsidies, temporarily granted from an imitator and less developed country, and the external negative effects arising from the eventual creation of excessive public deficits. We propose and numerically solve a model of a monetary union between two countries, one being innovator and the other imitator. Results suggest the pertinence of allowing for a temporary differentiation of fiscal discipline rules in favour of the less developed country. R&D subsidies granted by this country seem to lead to an easier catching-up without producing important negative external effects, also as not hurting severely the conditions for long-run sustainability of public accounts.

Suggested Citation

  • Afonso, Oscar & Alves, Rui Henrique & Vasconcelos, Paulo B., 2009. "Public deficits and economic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 1101-1109, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:26:y:2009:i:5:p:1101-1109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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