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Why do Koreans save so little?


  • Williamson, Jeffrey G.


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  • Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1979. "Why do Koreans save so little?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 343-362, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:6:y:1979:i:3:p:343-362

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Polemarchakis, H M, 1983. "On the Transer Paradox," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(3), pages 749-760, October.
    2. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1980. "Basic goods, the effects of commodity transfers and the international economic order," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 505-519, December.
    3. Balasko, Yves, 1978. "The Transfer Problem and the Theory of Regular Economies," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 19(3), pages 687-694, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jody Overland & Christopher D. Carroll & David N. Weil, 2000. "Saving and Growth with Habit Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 341-355, June.
    2. Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 9390, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Lewis Kubo & Robinson De Melo, 1983. "Modelos de Equilibrio General para el Análisis de Estrategias Alternativas de Comercio Exterior: Una Aplicación a Corea," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 20(61), pages 313-344.
    4. repec:jhu:papers:357 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Philippe Aghion & Diego Comin & Peter Howitt & Isabel Tecu, 2016. "When Does Domestic Savings Matter for Economic Growth?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 381-407, August.
    6. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(2), pages 1-25, September.
    7. Matthew Higgins & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 1996. "Asian Demography and Foreign Capital Dependence," NBER Working Papers 5560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Petar D. Vujanovic, 1999. "HABITS AND THE SAVINGS-GROWTH RELATIONSHIP Why US Personal Savings Rates Are At Historic Lows," Macroeconomics 9905002, EconWPA.
    9. Hahn, Jinsoo, 1995. "Do Koreans save optimally?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 429-442, August.

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