IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/cysrev/v97y2019icp3-13.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Inequality, material well-being, and subjective well-being: Exploring associations for children across 15 diverse countries

Author

Listed:
  • Main, Gill
  • Montserrat, Carme
  • Andresen, Sabine
  • Bradshaw, Jonathan
  • Lee, Bong Joo

Abstract

Children's material well-being, and the levels of wealth and inequality in societies within which children live, are important factors in determining outcomes. However, less is known about the extent to which these factors have an impact children's subjective well-being, especially in an internationally comparative context. This study draws on data from the Children's Worlds survey, an international study of child subjective well-being, to explore links between national level indicators of wealth and inequality (GDP and Gini coefficients), individual indicators of material well-being (the material resources children report having access to), and subjective well-being. The survey covers 15 diverse countries covering the continents of Europe, Asia, Africa and South America, with samples of at least 3000 per country, ages 8, 10 and 12. Analysis takes the form of a multilevel, varying intercepts and slopes model, examining the association between financial and material resources and inequality and subjective well-being across and between countries. Findings suggest that material resources that children report are significantly associated with subjective well-being, while indicators of financial resources and inequality at the national level are not. While a significant association between material resources and subjective well-being is found across the whole sample, the magnitude of this association, and the association between school- and country-level material resources, varies markedly. Within different countries, the strongest material resources-related predictor of overall subjective well-being may be either at the individual, school or country level.

Suggested Citation

  • Main, Gill & Montserrat, Carme & Andresen, Sabine & Bradshaw, Jonathan & Lee, Bong Joo, 2019. "Inequality, material well-being, and subjective well-being: Exploring associations for children across 15 diverse countries," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 3-13.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:97:y:2019:i:c:p:3-13
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.06.033
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917304553
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.06.033?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bruno Martorano & Luisa Natali & Chris De Neubourg & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2013. "Children’s Subjective Well-being in Rich Countries," Papers inwopa686, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Robert Cummins, 2003. "Normative Life Satisfaction: Measurement Issues and a Homeostatic Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 64(2), pages 225-256, November.
    3. Bradshaw, Jonathan & Keung, Antonia & Rees, Gwyther & Goswami, Haridhan, 2011. "Children's subjective well-being: International comparative perspectives," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 548-556, April.
    4. Hock-Eam Lim, 2008. "The Use of Different Happiness Rating Scales: Bias and Comparison Problem?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 87(2), pages 259-267, June.
    5. *Unicef, 2007. "Child Poverty in Perspective: An overview of child well-being in rich countries," Papers inreca07/19, Innocenti Report Card.
    6. Dinisman, Tamar & Montserrat, Carme & Casas, Ferran, 2012. "The subjective well-being of Spanish adolescents: Variations according to different living arrangements," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2374-2380.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ferran Casas & Mònica González-Carrasco & Xavier Oriol & Sara Malo, 2022. "Economic and Children’s Subjective Well-Being Indicators at the National Level in 35 Countries," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(5), pages 1539-1563, October.
    2. Sánchez-Sandoval, Yolanda & Aragón, Claudia & Verdugo, Laura, 2022. "Future expectations of adolescents in Residential Care: The role of self-perceptions," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).
    3. Chen, Ke-Mei, 2020. "Subjective poverty, deprivation, and the subjective well-being of children and young people: A multilevel growth curve analysis in Taiwan," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    4. Shamrova, Daria & Lampe, Joana, 2020. "Understanding patterns of child material deprivation in five regions of the world: A children’s rights perspective," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    5. Saswati Das & Diganta Mukherjee, 2023. "Multidimensional Deprivation from Children’s Perspectives: A Cross-National Comparative Analysis," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 16(3), pages 1097-1136, June.
    6. Mari Barrance, Rhian & May Hampton, Jennifer, 2023. "The relationship between subjective well-being in school and children’s participation rights: International evidence from the Children’s Worlds survey," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    7. Cho, Esther Yin-Nei & Yu, Fuk-Yuen, 2020. "A review of measurement tools for child wellbeing," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C).
    8. Marja Lindberg & Mikael Nygård & Fredrica Nyqvist & Mia Hakovirta, 2021. "Financial Stress and Subjective Wellbeing among Children -Evidence from Finland," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 14(2), pages 799-819, April.
    9. Francesca Giambona & Mariano Porcu & Isabella Sulis, 2023. "Does education protect families' well-being in times of crisis? Measurement issues and empirical findings from IT-SILC data," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 32(1), pages 299-328, March.
    10. Stefan Kühner & Maggie Lau & Evelyn Aboagye Addae, 2021. "The Mediating Role of Social Capital in the Relationship Between Hong Kong Children’s Socioeconomic Status and Subjective Well-Being," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 14(5), pages 1881-1909, October.
    11. Carla González-García & Alba Águila-Otero & Carme Montserrat & Susana Lázaro & Eduardo Martín & Jorge Fernandez del Valle & Amaia Bravo, 2022. "Subjective Well-Being of Young People in Therapeutic Residential Care from a Gender Perspective," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(1), pages 249-262, February.
    12. Shan Jiang & Lin Wang & Yuhang Cheng, 2023. "Unrevealing the Mediating Mechanisms Between Material Deprivation and Children’s Life Satisfaction: Empirical Evidence from the International Survey of Children’s Well-Being," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 18(2), pages 893-914, April.
    13. Daphna Gross-Manos & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2022. "The Association Between the Material Well-Being and the Subjective Well-Being of Children in 35 Countries," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(1), pages 1-33, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Cho, Esther Yin-Nei & Yu, Fuk-Yuen, 2020. "A review of measurement tools for child wellbeing," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C).
    2. Yipeng Tang, 2019. "Immigration Status and Adolescent Life Satisfaction: An International Comparative Analysis Based on PISA 2015," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 20(5), pages 1499-1518, June.
    3. Tineke DeJonge & Wim Kalmijn & Ruut Veenhoven & Lidia Arends, 2015. "Stability of Boundaries Between Response Options of Response Scales: Does ‘Very Happy’ Remain Equally Happy over the Years?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 241-266, August.
    4. Pei-shan Liao, 2014. "More Happy or Less Unhappy? Comparison of the Balanced and Unbalanced Designs for the Response Scale of General Happiness," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(6), pages 1407-1423, December.
    5. Mathew Y. H. Wong & Wing Hong Chui, 2017. "Economic Development and Subjective Well-being: A Comparative Study of Adolescents in Hong Kong and Macau," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 10(1), pages 247-265, March.
    6. Tineke Jonge & Ruut Veenhoven & Lidia Arends, 2014. "Homogenizing Responses to Different Survey Questions on the Same Topic: Proposal of a Scale Homogenization Method Using a Reference Distribution," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 275-300, May.
    7. Dorota Strózik & Tomasz Strózik & Krzysztof Szwarc, 2016. "The Subjective Well-Being of School Children. The First Findings from the Children’s Worlds Study in Poland," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 9(1), pages 39-50, March.
    8. Amy Clair, 2019. "Housing: an Under-Explored Influence on Children’s Well-Being and Becoming," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(2), pages 609-626, April.
    9. Shazly Savahl & Sabirah Adams & Ferran Casas & Maria Florence, 2023. "Children’s Interactions with Family and Friends in Constrained Contexts: Considerations for Children’s Subjective Well-Being," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 18(1), pages 321-339, February.
    10. Mari Barrance, Rhian & May Hampton, Jennifer, 2023. "The relationship between subjective well-being in school and children’s participation rights: International evidence from the Children’s Worlds survey," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    11. Irina V. Leto & Evgeniya N. Petrenko & Helena R. Slobodskaya, 2019. "Life Satisfaction in Russian Primary Schoolchildren: Links with Personality and Family Environment," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 20(6), pages 1893-1912, August.
    12. Daphna Gross-Manos & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2022. "The Association Between the Material Well-Being and the Subjective Well-Being of Children in 35 Countries," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(1), pages 1-33, February.
    13. Kyoungmi Park & Shun Wang, 2019. "Youth Activities and Children’s Subjective Well-Being in Korea," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 20(7), pages 2351-2365, October.
    14. Almudena Moreno Mínguez, 2017. "The Role of Family Policy in Explaining the International Variation in Child Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 1173-1194, December.
    15. Christian Bjørnskov, 2010. "How Comparable are the Gallup World Poll Life Satisfaction Data?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 41-60, March.
    16. Fabiane Friedrich Schütz & Lívia Maria Bedin & Jorge Castellá Sarriera, 2019. "Subjective Well-Being of Brazilian Children from Different Family Settings," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 14(3), pages 737-750, July.
    17. Javier Torres-Vallejos & Ferran Casas & Marian Bilbao & Verónica López & Alejandra Caqueo-Urízar & Jerome Flores & Ana María Squicciarini & Paola Sánchez, 2022. "Subjective Well-Being of Children and Adolescents from Ethnic Minorities in Chile," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 15(6), pages 1945-1965, December.
    18. Dinisman, Tamar & Montserrat, Carme & Casas, Ferran, 2012. "The subjective well-being of Spanish adolescents: Variations according to different living arrangements," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2374-2380.
    19. Marja Lindberg & Mikael Nygård & Fredrica Nyqvist & Mia Hakovirta, 2021. "Financial Stress and Subjective Wellbeing among Children -Evidence from Finland," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 14(2), pages 799-819, April.
    20. Kosher, Hanita & Ben-Arieh, Asher, 2017. "Religion and subjective well-being among children: A comparison of six religion groups," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 63-77.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:97:y:2019:i:c:p:3-13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.