IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/cysrev/v71y2016icp36-44.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Physical abuse after child protective services investigation and adolescent substance use

Author

Listed:
  • Kobulsky, Julia M.
  • Holmes, Megan R.
  • Yoon, Susan
  • Perzynski, Adam T.

Abstract

The longitudinal pathways connecting physical abuse and substance use in child welfare-involved adolescents, a population with multiple risk factors for substance use problems, remain unclear. This study examined the relation between self-reported physical abuse among adolescents investigated by Child Protective Services (CPS) and later substance use, with a particular focus on exposure to physical abuse after CPS investigation as a potential contributing factor to this relation. Using data from the first National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW-I), a path analysis was conducted on a sample of 1079 adolescents aged 11–15years who had recently been investigated by CPS. At baseline and 18-month follow-up, youths self-reported past-year physical abuse using the Parent-Child Conflicts Tactic Scale and past 30-day substance use frequency. At baseline, youths self-reported current internalizing and externalizing problems to the Youth Self Report. Path analysis revealed no significant relation between physical abuse at baseline and substance use at 18months. Physical abuse at baseline was associated with higher levels of concurrent substance use and externalizing problems, which in turn predicted higher substance use at 18months. Furthermore, physical abuse and externalizing problems at baseline predicted physical abuse at 18months, which in turn was related to higher substance use at 18months. The findings suggest that physical abuse after CPS investigation contributes to the development of adolescent substance use behaviors. Results indicate a need for innovative efforts to prevent physical abuse after CPS investigation, as well as assessment and treatment of substance use and externalizing problems at the point of investigation, to reduce future substance use in child welfare-involved adolescents.

Suggested Citation

  • Kobulsky, Julia M. & Holmes, Megan R. & Yoon, Susan & Perzynski, Adam T., 2016. "Physical abuse after child protective services investigation and adolescent substance use," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 36-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:71:y:2016:i:c:p:36-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.10.033
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740916303577
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Narendorf, Sarah Carter & McMillen, J. Curtis, 2010. "Substance use and substance use disorders as foster youth transition to adulthood," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 113-119, January.
    2. Cheng, Tyrone C. & Lo, Celia C., 2012. "Nonmedical use of prescription medications: A longitudinal analysis with adolescents involved in child welfare," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 859-864.
    3. Cheng, Tyrone C. & Lo, Celia C., 2010. "The roles of parenting and child welfare services in alcohol use by adolescents," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 38-43, January.
    4. Cheng, Tyrone C. & Lo, Celia C., 2010. "Drug use among maltreated adolescents receiving child welfare services," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 1735-1739, December.
    5. Cheng, Tyrone C. & Lo, Celia C., 2011. "A longitudinal analysis of some risk and protective factors in marijuana use by adolescents receiving child welfare services," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(9), pages 1667-1672, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:cysrev:v:83:y:2017:i:c:p:25-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:cysrev:v:82:y:2017:i:c:p:271-279 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:cysrev:v:94:y:2018:i:c:p:72-81 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:71:y:2016:i:c:p:36-44. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.