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The link between male employment and child maltreatment in the U.S., 2000–2012

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  • Cherry, Robert
  • Wang, Chun

Abstract

Child maltreatment rates are strongly linked to adult male behavior, suggesting that labor market conditions, by influencing male behaviors, can influence maltreatment rates. Using the unemployment rate as the sole measure of labor market conditions, past studies generally conclude that employment conditions do not systematically influence child maltreatment rates. By contrast, this study found that state-level child maltreatment rates were statistically significant and inversely related to the state-level employment rates of men, aged 20 to 34yrs old. It also found that the interaction of child poverty and living in a single-parent household is positively related to child maltreatment rates. Policies to reduce employment problems are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Cherry, Robert & Wang, Chun, 2016. "The link between male employment and child maltreatment in the U.S., 2000–2012," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 117-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:66:y:2016:i:c:p:117-122
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.05.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Drake, Brett & Lee, Sang Moo & Jonson-Reid, Melissa, 2009. "Race and child maltreatment reporting: Are Blacks overrepresented?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 309-316, March.
    2. Jason M. Lindo & Jessamyn Schaller & Benjamin Hansen, 2013. "Caution! Men Not at Work: Gender-Specific Labor Market Conditions and Child Maltreatment," NBER Working Papers 18994, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lindo, Jason M. & Schaller, Jessamyn & Hansen, Benjamin, 2013. "Economic Conditions and Child Abuse," IZA Discussion Papers 7355, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Janet Currie & Erdal Tekin, 2012. "Understanding the Cycle: Childhood Maltreatment and Future Crime," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 509-549.
    5. Carlos Seiglie, 2004. "Understanding Child Outcomes: An Application to Child Abuse and Neglect," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 143-160, June.
    6. Millett, Lina & Lanier, Paul & Drake, Brett, 2011. "Are economic trends associated with child maltreatment? Preliminary results from the recent recession using state level data," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1280-1287, July.
    7. Marianne P. Bitler & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "Child Maltreatment, Abortion Availability, and Economic Conditions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 119-141, June.
    8. Derek Neal & Armin Rick, 2014. "The Prison Boom and the Lack of Black Progress after Smith and Welch," NBER Working Papers 20283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    1. repec:eee:cysrev:v:100:y:2019:i:c:p:384-392 is not listed on IDEAS

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