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Assessing self-control and strain of delinquent peer association trajectories within developmental perspectives: A latent class growth analysis approach

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  • Cho, Sujung
  • Lee, Yung Hyeock

Abstract

This study examines the impacts of self-control and strain variables as integrated and exclusive forces on trajectory class membership of delinquent peer association and the mediating role of self-control in GST predictions. The study also examines how later delinquency (online and offline) varies on class membership. Using longitudinal data of 2351 Korean adolescents, it employs a latent class growth analysis to identify distinct subgroups, each having a similar pattern of delinquent peer association trajectories over a five-year period. The analysis yields three subgroups: early-onset (0.9% of the sample), late peak (3.5%), and normative trajectory (95.6%). The results reveal that low self-control and strain have an exclusive influence on delinquent peer association for only the early-onset group, compared to the normative group. Low self-control partially mediates the strain-peer delinquency relationship in the early onset group. The late peak group has a higher likelihood of engaging in later delinquency and cyber-deviance.

Suggested Citation

  • Cho, Sujung & Lee, Yung Hyeock, 2020. "Assessing self-control and strain of delinquent peer association trajectories within developmental perspectives: A latent class growth analysis approach," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:109:y:2020:i:c:s0190740919309272
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104745
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    References listed on IDEAS

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