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Invention and accumulation in america's economic growth: A nineteenth-century parable

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  • David, Paul A.

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  • David, Paul A., 1977. "Invention and accumulation in america's economic growth: A nineteenth-century parable," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 179-228, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:crcspp:v:6:y:1977:i::p:179-228
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles I. Jones, 2002. "Sources of U.S. Economic Growth in a World of Ideas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 220-239, March.
    2. Francisco Alcalá & Antonio Ciccone, 2004. "Trade and Productivity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(2), pages 613-646.
    3. Skinner, Jonathon, 1988. "Taxation and output growth in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 73, The World Bank.
    4. Thomas Weiss, 1989. "Economic Growth Before 1860: Revised Conjectures," NBER Historical Working Papers 0007, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. J. Bradford De Long, "undated". "Productivity and Machinery Investment: A Long Run Look 1870-1980," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _118, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
    6. Miguel Lebre de Freitas, 2007. "Sobre a perda de ímpeto no processo de convergência da economia portuguesa: uma abordagem dogmática," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 25, pages 27-41, June.
    7. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    8. Alan M. Taylor, 1996. "International Capital Mobility in History: The Saving-Investment Relationship," NBER Working Papers 5743, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Taylor, Alan M & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 1994. "Capital Flows to the New World as an Intergenerational Transfer," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 348-371, April.
    10. John A. James, 1985. "Shifts in the Nineteenth-Century Phillips Curve Relationship," NBER Working Papers 1587, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
    12. Jonathan S. Skinner, 1987. "Taxation and Output Growth: Evidence from African Countries," NBER Working Papers 2335, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Suto, Isao & James, John A., 1999. "Savings and early economic growth in the United States and Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 161-183, April.

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