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Testing for horizontal and vertical foreign investment spillovers in China, 1998–2007

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  • Du, Luosha
  • Harrison, Ann
  • Jefferson, Gary H.

Abstract

As with many developing countries, the Chinese government hopes that knowledge brought by multinationals will spill over to domestic industries and increase their productivity. In this paper, we show that foreign investment originating outside of Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan has positive effects on individual firm level productivity, while foreign investment from HKMT firms does not. We also test for both horizontal (within the same industry) and vertical (upstream or downstream) linkages from foreign investment. Using a manufacturing firm-level panel for 1998 through 2007, we find zero or weak positive horizontal externalities. However, our results show that foreign direct investment (FDI) has generated positive productivity spillovers to domestic firms via backward linkages (the contacts between foreign affiliates and their local suppliers in downstream sectors) as well as forward linkages (between foreign suppliers and their local buyers in the upstream sectors).

Suggested Citation

  • Du, Luosha & Harrison, Ann & Jefferson, Gary H., 2012. "Testing for horizontal and vertical foreign investment spillovers in China, 1998–2007," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 234-243.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:234-243
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2011.01.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lipsey, Robert E. & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2011. "South–South FDI and Development in East Asia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 11-31.
    2. Philippe Aghion & Jing Cai & Mathias Dewatripont & Luosha Du & Ann Harrison & Patrick Legros, 2015. "Industrial Policy and Competition," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 1-32, October.
    3. Anwar, Sajid & Sun, Sizhong, 2014. "Heterogeneity and curvilinearity of FDI-related productivity spillovers in China's manufacturing sector," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 23-32.
    4. Fredrik Sjöholm & Nannan Lundin, 2013. "Foreign Firms and Indigenous Technology Development in the People's Republic of China," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(2), pages 49-75, September.
    5. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:jebusi:v:93:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Brandt, Loren & Thun, Eric, 2016. "Constructing a Ladder for Growth: Policy, Markets, and Industrial Upgrading in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 78-95.
    8. Jin, Shaosheng & Guo, Haiyue & Delgado, Michael S. & Wang, H. Holly, 2017. "Benefit or damage? The productivity effects of FDI in the Chinese food industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 1-9.
    9. Harrison, Ann, 2012. "Review of "Industrial Policy and Development: The Political Economy of Capabilities Accumulation"," MPRA Paper 47865, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Gunby, Philip & Jin, Yinghua & Robert Reed, W., 2017. "Did FDI Really Cause Chinese Economic Growth? A Meta-Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 242-255.
    11. Cheryl Xiaoning Long & Galina Hale & Hirotaka Miura, 2014. "Productivity Spillovers from FDI in the People's Republic of China: A Nuanced View," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 31(2), pages 77-108, September.
    12. Anwar, Sajid & Sun, Sizhong, 2012. "FDI and market entry/exit: Evidence from China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 487-498.
    13. Fei Yu & Yanrui Wu, 2013. "Patent Citations and Knowledge Spillovers: An Analysis of Chinese Patents Registered in the US," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 13-08, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    14. Chiara Franco & John P. Weche Gelübcke, 2015. "The Death of German Firms: What Role for Foreign Direct Investment?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 677-703, April.
    15. Hübler, Michael, 2015. "Labor mobility and technology diffusion: A new concept and its application to rural Southeast Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 137-151.
    16. Anwar, Sajid & Nguyen, Lan Phi, 2014. "Is foreign direct investment productive? A case study of the regions of Vietnam," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(7), pages 1376-1387.
    17. Paitoon Wiboonchutikula & Chayanon Phucharoen & Nuchit Pruektanakul, 2016. "Spillover Effects Of Foreign Direct Investment On Domestic Manufacturing Firms In Thailand," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(02), pages 1-32, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; Horizontal spillover effect; Backward and forward linkages; China's manufacturing industries;

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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