IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/agiwat/v141y2014icp30-46.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Infiltration and planting pits for improved water management and maize yield in semi-arid Zimbabwe

Author

Listed:
  • Nyakudya, Innocent Wadzanayi
  • Stroosnijder, Leo
  • Nyagumbo, Isaiah

Abstract

Realising that rainwater harvesting (RWH) improves crop productivity, smallholder farmers in semi-arid Zimbabwe modified contour ridges traditionally used for rainwater management by digging infiltration pits inside contour ridge channels in order to retain more water in crop fields. However, scientific studies on crop yield benefits of infiltration pits have not been conclusive. Combining field-edge RWH methods such as contour ridges with infiltration pits with in-field practices may enhance crop yield benefits. Thus, the objective of the study was to assess soil moisture and maize yield improvement of combining infiltration and planting pits. Field experiments were conducted in Rushinga, Zimbabwe for three seasons at three sites using a split-plot design: main-plot factor, field-edge rainwater management method (RWMM); and split-plot factor, tillage method. Soil moisture content was measured weekly using gravimetric and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) methods. A household and field survey to establish farmers’ perceptions, typology and availability of field-edge RWMM was conducted. In order to share experiences and enhance stakeholders’ learning, field days were held. Lateral movement of soil water was measured up to 2m downslope from infiltration pits, hence infiltration pits did not improve maize yield and soil moisture content in the cropping area. Maize yield (kgha−1) was 45% higher under conventional tillage (2697) than planting pits (1852) but the yield gap decreased from 90 to 30% in the first and third year respectively. The value of infiltration pits is in reducing soil erosion by water and growing high value horticultural crops inside and close to pits, a view shared by host farmers and other stakeholders. Planting pits are an option for farmers without access to draught power and a fall-back method. Research is required to determine soil moisture, maize yield benefits and waterlogging risk in fields with underlying impermeable layers that enhance lateral flow of water.

Suggested Citation

  • Nyakudya, Innocent Wadzanayi & Stroosnijder, Leo & Nyagumbo, Isaiah, 2014. "Infiltration and planting pits for improved water management and maize yield in semi-arid Zimbabwe," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 30-46.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agiwat:v:141:y:2014:i:c:p:30-46
    DOI: 10.1016/j.agwat.2014.04.010
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378377414001218
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.agwat.2014.04.010?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nyakudya, I.W. & Stroosnijder, L., 2011. "Water management options based on rainfall analysis for rainfed maize (Zea mays L.) production in Rushinga district, Zimbabwe," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 98(10), pages 1649-1659, August.
    2. Panigrahi, B. & Panda, Sudhindra N., 2003. "Field test of a soil water balance simulation model," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 223-240, February.
    3. Kinsey, Bill & Burger, Kees & Gunning, Jan Willem, 1998. "Coping with drought in Zimbabwe: Survey evidence on responses of rural households to risk," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 89-110, January.
    4. Giller, Ken E. & Rowe, Ed C. & de Ridder, Nico & van Keulen, Herman, 2006. "Resource use dynamics and interactions in the tropics: Scaling up in space and time," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 8-27, April.
    5. Wiyo, K. A. & Kasomekera, Z. M. & Feyen, J., 2000. "Effect of tied-ridging on soil water status of a maize crop under Malawi conditions," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 101-125, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wolka, Kebede & Mulder, Jan & Biazin, Birhanu, 2018. "Effects of soil and water conservation techniques on crop yield, runoff and soil loss in Sub-Saharan Africa: A review," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 207(C), pages 67-79.
    2. Nyakudya, Innocent Wadzanayi & Stroosnijder, Leo, 2014. "Effect of rooting depth, plant density and planting date on maize (Zea mays L.) yield and water use efficiency in semi-arid Zimbabwe: Modelling with AquaCrop," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 280-296.
    3. Cecilia M. Onyango & Justine M. Nyaga & Johanna Wetterlind & Mats Söderström & Kristin Piikki, 2021. "Precision Agriculture for Resource Use Efficiency in Smallholder Farming Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(3), pages 1-17, January.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Nyakudya, Innocent Wadzanayi & Stroosnijder, Leo, 2014. "Effect of rooting depth, plant density and planting date on maize (Zea mays L.) yield and water use efficiency in semi-arid Zimbabwe: Modelling with AquaCrop," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 280-296.
    2. Srivastava, Amit Kumar & Mboh, Cho Miltin & Gaiser, Thomas & Kuhn, Arnim & Ermias, Engida & Ewert, Frank, 2019. "Effect of mineral fertilizer on rain water and radiation use efficiencies for maize yield and stover biomass productivity in Ethiopia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 88-100.
    3. Lazzaroni, Sara & Wagner, Natascha, 2016. "Misfortunes never come singly: Structural change, multiple shocks and child malnutrition in rural Senegal," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 246-262.
    4. van den Berg, Marrit & Burger, Kees, 2008. "Household Consumption and Natural Disasters: The Case of Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 44380, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Deininger, Klaus & Hoogeveen, Hans & Kinsey, Bill H., 2004. "Economic Benefits and Costs of Land Redistribution in Zimbabwe in the Early 1980s," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1697-1709, October.
    6. Jin, Ling & Chen, Kevin Z. & Yu, Bingxin & Filipski, Mateusz, 2015. "Farmers' Coping Strategies against an Aggregate Shock: Evidence from the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211814, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Andersson, Jafet C.M. & Zehnder, Alexander J.B. & Rockström, Johan & Yang, Hong, 2011. "Potential impacts of water harvesting and ecological sanitation on crop yield, evaporation and river flow regimes in the Thukela River basin, South Africa," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 98(7), pages 1113-1124, May.
    8. Poulton, Colin & Davies, Rob & Matshe, Innocent & Urey, Ian, 2002. "A Review Of Zimbabwe'S Agricultural Economic Policies: 1980 - 2000," ADU Working Papers 10922, Imperial College at Wye, Department of Agricultural Sciences.
    9. Janna Frischen & Isabel Meza & Daniel Rupp & Katharina Wietler & Michael Hagenlocher, 2020. "Drought Risk to Agricultural Systems in Zimbabwe: A Spatial Analysis of Hazard, Exposure, and Vulnerability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-23, January.
    10. Holden , Stein & Fischer, Monica, 2015. "Can Adoption of Improved Maize Varieties Help Smallholder Farmers Adapt to Drought? Evidence from Malawi," CLTS Working Papers 1/15, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, revised 11 Oct 2019.
    11. Santos, Florence & Fletschner, Diana & Savath, Vivien & Peterman, Amber, 2014. "Can Government-Allocated Land Contribute to Food Security? Intrahousehold Analysis of West Bengal’s Microplot Allocation Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 860-872.
    12. Kusunose, Yoko & Lybbert, Travis J., 2014. "Coping with Drought by Adjusting Land Tenancy Contracts: A Model and Evidence from Rural Morocco," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 114-126.
    13. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
    14. R. Manzanas & L. Fiwa & C. Vanya & H. Kanamaru & J. M. Gutiérrez, 2020. "Statistical downscaling or bias adjustment? A case study involving implausible climate change projections of precipitation in Malawi," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 1437-1453, October.
    15. Pierre Janin, 2004. "Gestion spatio-temporelle de la soudure alimentaire dans le Sahel burkinabé," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 45(180), pages 909-933.
    16. Nillesen, Eleonora & Verwim, Philip, 2010. "A Phoenix in Flames? Portfolio Choice and Violence in Civil War in Rural Burundi," WIDER Working Paper Series 044, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    17. Dekker, Marleen, 2004. "Sustainability and Resourcefulness: Support Networks During Periods of Stress," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1735-1751, October.
    18. Sanginga, Nteranya, 2012. "Closing the yield gap through integrated soil fertility management," 2012: The Scramble for Natural Resources: More Food, Less Land?, 9-10 October 2012 152417, Crawford Fund.
    19. Mandal, Uttam Kumar & Victor, U.S. & Srivastava, N.N. & Sharma, K.L. & Ramesh, V. & Vanaja, M. & Korwar, G.R. & Ramakrishna, Y.S., 2007. "Estimating yield of sorghum using root zone water balance model and spectral characteristics of crop in a dryland Alfisol," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 315-327, February.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:agiwat:v:141:y:2014:i:c:p:30-46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/agwat .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/agwat .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.