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Technology, Trade and Factor Mobility

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  • Purvis, Douglas D

Abstract

The well-known factor price equalization theorem is often invoked to provide trade theorists with justification for the conventional assumption of complete international immobility of factors of production. If conditions of the theorem are satisfied, and free trade does in fact give rise to the equalization of factor returns, then it is inconsequential in which country production takes place. Mundell's original analysis then brings us full circle to the "commodity price equalization theorem". If the conditions of the factor price equalization theorem are met, but a tariff on trade is imposed, then factor mobility can replace trade in establishing productive efficiency. Recent work by Jones and Kemp have analysed further the implications of introducing factor mobility and in particular capital mobility into the analysis of international trade. However, these have concentrated on generating optimum tariff and tax( on capital services) formulae for the individual country trying to maximize its own welfare. The present paper is more in the tradition of the Mundell analysis in that we are more concerned with world efficiency in production--that is, in maximizing potential world welfare.
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Suggested Citation

  • Purvis, Douglas D, 1972. "Technology, Trade and Factor Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(327), pages 991-999, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:82:y:1972:i:327:p:991-99
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabien Candau, 2013. "Trade, FDI and Migration," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 441-461, September.
    2. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:9:p:1934-1957 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Oscar Bajo & María Montero, "undated". "Foreign direct investment and trade: A causality analysis," Studies on the Spanish Economy 06, FEDEA.
    4. Linda S. Goldberg & Michael W. Klein, 1999. "International trade and factor mobility: an empirical investigation," Staff Reports 81, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. repec:ags:ucdegw:233007 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Unbreen Qayyum & Zafar Mahmood, 2013. "Inter-linkage between Foreign Direct Investment and Foreign Trade in Pakistan: Are they Complements or Substitute?," PIDE-Working Papers 2013:91, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    7. Springer, Katrin, 2000. "Do We Have to Consider International Capital Mobility in Trade Models?," Kiel Working Papers 964, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    8. Oscar Bajo-Rubio & María Montero-Muñoz, 2001. "Foreign Direct Investment and Trade: A Causality Analysis," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 305-323, July.
    9. Jonathan Eaton & Akiko Tamura, 1996. "Japanese and U.S. Exports and Investment as Conduits of Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 5, pages 51-75 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Jin Inhwan, 2008. "Is Japanese FDI a Substitute for or a Complement to Trade in Asia?," TERG Discussion Papers 236, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University, revised Oct 2008.
    11. Thomas, E. Scott & Martin, Philip L. & Richards, Alan, 1982. "Complementarity of Trade and Labor Migration," Working Papers 233007, University of California, Davis, Agricultural Development Systems: Egypt Project.
    12. Michael Carlberg, 1984. "International Factor Movements, Allocation and Prices," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 120(I), pages 31-42, March.
    13. Rudy Rahmaddi & Masaru Ichihashi, 2012. "The impact of foreign direct investment on host country exports: Sector based evidence from Indonesian manufacturing," IDEC DP2 Series 2-10, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    14. Marzenna Weresa, 2001. "The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Poland's Trade with the European Union," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 71-83.

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