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The Rise and Fall of Unionised Labour Markets: A Political Economy Approach

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  • Woojin Lee
  • John E. Roemer

Abstract

Studying a model where trade unions interact with endogenously formed partisan political parties, we explain changing political preferences for and against the unionised labour market regime. We focus on the changes in coalition formation between unskilled and moderately skilled workers, which in turn depend on inequality among workers. When inequality is either very low or very high, moderately skilled workers form a political coalition with unskilled workers to support a unionised labour market regime. In other cases, the economic interest of the moderately skilled workers is more in line with that of highly skilled workers and capital owners to support a competitive labour market regime. Copyright 2005 Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Woojin Lee & John E. Roemer, 2005. "The Rise and Fall of Unionised Labour Markets: A Political Economy Approach," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 28-67, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:115:y:2005:i:500:p:28-67
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Roemer, 2005. "Distribution and politics: a brief history and prospect," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 25(2), pages 507-525, December.
    2. M. Castellani & L. Fanelli & M. Savioli, 2015. "Government fiscal efforts vs. labour union strikes. Strategic substitutes or complements?," Working Papers wp1013, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    3. Campante, Filipe R., 2011. "Redistribution in a model of voting and campaign contributions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 646-656, August.
    4. Dasgupta, Indraneel, 2009. "'Living' wage, class conflict and ethnic strife," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 750-765, November.
    5. De Donder, Philippe & Hindriks, Jean, 2007. "Equilibrium social insurance with policy-motivated parties," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 624-640, September.
    6. Xiujian Chen & Shu Lin & W. Robert Reed, 2005. "Another Look At What To Do With Time-Series Cross-Section Data," Econometrics 0506004, EconWPA.
    7. Woojin Lee, 2014. "Inequality and Redistribution: Political Parties May Matter," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 170(3), pages 482-495, September.
    8. Anesi, Vincent & De Donder, Philippe, 2009. "A Positive Theory of Unemployment Insurance and Employment Protection," CEPR Discussion Papers 7333, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Llavador, Humberto & Solano-García, Angel, 2011. "Immigration policy with partisan parties," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1-2), pages 134-142, February.
    10. Jaitman, Laura, 2013. "The causal effect of compulsory voting laws on turnout: Does skill matter?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 79-93.
    11. Dimick, Matthew & Rao, Neel, 2016. "Wage-setting institutions and corporate governance," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 854-883.
    12. repec:gra:wpaper:13/06 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Vincent Anesi & Philippe De Donder, 2013. "A coalitional theory of unemployment insurance and employment protection," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(3), pages 941-977, April.

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