IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ecj/econjl/v102y1992i412p437-60.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Marshallian vs. Walrasian Stability in an Experimental Market

Author

Listed:
  • Plott, Charles R
  • George, Glen

Abstract

Twelve markets were studied. All markets had downward sloping supply functions created by Marshallian-type external economies in which the costs of individual firms increase with their own volume but decrease with the market volume of all other firms. The conditions were such that the model dp/dt = f (excess demand), typically called the Walrasian theory of dynamics, gives predictions about the dynamics of market behavior opposite of the model dq/dt = "phi" (demand price minus supply price), which is typically called the Marshallian theory. The market organizations studied were double auction, sealed bid/offer and (secant) tatonnement. In all cases the Marshallian theory of dynamics was the better model of market behavior. Copyright 1992 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Plott, Charles R & George, Glen, 1992. "Marshallian vs. Walrasian Stability in an Experimental Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(412), pages 437-460, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:102:y:1992:i:412:p:437-60
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0133%28199205%29102%3A412%3C437%3AMVWSIA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-N&origin=bc
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. C.Mónica Capra & Tomomi Tanaka & ColinF. Camerer & Lauren Feiler & Veronica Sovero & CharlesN. Noussair, 2009. "The Impact of Simple Institutions in Experimental Economies with Poverty Traps," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(539), pages 977-1009, July.
    2. Sean Crockett, 2013. "Price Dynamics In General Equilibrium Experiments," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 421-438, July.
    3. Noussair, C.N. & Plott, C. & Riezman, R., 2007. "Production, trade and exchange rates in large experimental economies," Other publications TiSEM 3bf683fe-0650-4e8a-8682-c, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Vivian Lei & Charles N. Noussair, 2007. "Equilibrium Selection in an Experimental Macroeconomy," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 448-482, October.
    5. Junyi Shen & Ken-Ichi Shimomura & Takehiko Yamato & Tokinao Ohtaka & Kiyotaka Takahashi, 2015. "Revisiting Marshallian versus Walrasian Stability in an Experimental Market," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-30, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised May 2016.
    6. Goeree, Jacob K. & Lindsay, Luke, 2016. "Market design and the stability of general equilibrium," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 37-68.
    7. Anderson, Christopher M. & Plott, Charles R. & Shimomura, K.-I.Ken-Ichi & Granat, Sander, 2004. "Global instability in experimental general equilibrium: the Scarf example," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 209-249, April.
    8. Plott, Charles & Roy, Nilanjan & Tong, Baojia, 2013. "Marshall and Walras, disequilibrium trades and the dynamics of equilibration in the continuous double auction market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 190-205.
    9. Kleineidam, U. & Lambert, A. J. D. & Blansjaar, J. & Kok, J. J. & van Heijningen, R. J. J., 2000. "Optimising product recycling chains by control theory," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 185-195, June.
    10. Paul Brewer & Maria Huang & Brad Nelson & Charles Plott, 2002. "On the Behavioral Foundations of the Law of Supply and Demand: Human Convergence and Robot Randomness," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 5(3), pages 179-208, December.
    11. Joyce, Patrick, 1998. "Demand revelation and tatonnement auctions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 163-175, August.
    12. Ortmann, Andreas, 2003. "Charles R. Plott's collected papers on the experimental foundations of economic and political science," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 555-575, August.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:102:y:1992:i:412:p:437-60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/resssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.