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An integrated approach to cause-of-death analysis: cause-deleted life tables and decompositions of life expectancy

Author

Listed:
  • Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Samuel Preston

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Vladimir Canudas-Romo

    (Australian National University)

Abstract

This article integrates two methods that analyze the implications of various causes of death for life expectancy. One of the methods attributes changes in life expectancy to various causes of death; the other method examines the effect of removing deaths from a particular cause on life expectancy. This integration is accomplished by new formulas that make clearer the interactions among causes of death in determining life expectancy. We apply our approach to changes in life expectancy in the United States between 1970 and 2000. We demonstrate, and explain analytically, the paradox that cancer is responsible for more years of life lost in 2000 than in 1970 despite the fact that declines in cancer mortality contributed to advances in life expectancy between 1970 and 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez & Samuel Preston & Vladimir Canudas-Romo, 2008. "An integrated approach to cause-of-death analysis: cause-deleted life tables and decompositions of life expectancy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(35), pages 1323-1350, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:35
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/35/19-35.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James W. Vaupel & Vladimir Canudas-Romo, 2002. "Decomposing demographic change into direct vs. compositional components," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(1), pages 1-14, July.
    2. J. Pollard, 1988. "On the decomposition of changes in expectation of life and differentials in life expectancy," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(2), pages 265-276, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Julio E. Romero-Prieto, 2016. "Aspectos socieconómicos de la mortalidad en el Pacifico colombiano," Revista Economía y Región, Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar, vol. 10(2), pages 75-124, December.
    2. Karina Acosta-Ordoñez & Julio E. Romero-Prieto, 2017. "Cambios recientes en las principales causas de mortalidad en Colombia," Chapters,in: Jaime Bonet & Karelys Guzmán-Finol & Lucas Wilfried Hahn-De-Castro (ed.), La salud en Colombia: una perspectiva regional, chapter 4, pages 79-119 Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    3. repec:dem:demres:v:41:y:2019:i:4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:thpobi:v:80:y:2011:i:1:p:38-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Schnittker, Jason & Karandinos, George, 2010. "Methuselah's medicine: Pharmaceutical innovation and mortality in the United States, 1960-2000," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(7), pages 961-968, April.
    6. Yang, Seungmi & Khang, Young-Ho & Chun, Heeran & Harper, Sam & Lynch, John, 2012. "The changing gender differences in life expectancy in Korea 1970–2005," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(7), pages 1280-1287.
    7. Glenn Firebaugh & Francesco Acciai & Aggie Noah & Christopher J Prather & Claudia Nau, 2014. "Why the racial gap in life expectancy is declining in the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(32), pages 975-1006, October.
    8. Irma Elo & Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez & James Macinko, 2014. "The Contribution of Health Care and Other Interventions to Black–White Disparities in Life Expectancy, 1980–2007," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(1), pages 97-126, February.
    9. Marie-Pier Bergeron-Boucher & Marcus Ebeling & Vladimir Canudas-Romo, 2015. "Decomposing changes in life expectancy: Compression versus shifting mortality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(14), pages 391-424, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cause of death; decomposition; demography; life expectancy; life tables; morbidity; mortality;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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