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SOES Trading and Market Volatility

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  • Battalio, Robert H.
  • Hatch, Brian
  • Jennings, Robert

Abstract

The National Association of Security Dealers alleges that professional-trader use of the Small Order Execution System (SOES) causes greater security price volatility. We document bidirectional Granger causality between a proxy for professional SOES trading (the frequency of maximum-sized SOES trades) and a measure of stock price volatility. We find that high levels of volatility precede high levels of maximum-sized SOES trades, suggesting that volatility causes more frequent large SOES trades. Likewise, over a one-minute time interval, high levels of maximum-sized SOES trades cause high volatility. Over longer periods, however, intense maximum-sized SOES trading causes lower volatility. Interpreted in conjunction with Harris and Schultz (1997), these results suggest that high levels of maximum-sized SOES trades lead to more efficient price discovery. In light of these results, we believe that efforts to eliminate SOES based on volatility considerations are unwarranted.

Suggested Citation

  • Battalio, Robert H. & Hatch, Brian & Jennings, Robert, 1997. "SOES Trading and Market Volatility," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(2), pages 225-238, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:32:y:1997:i:02:p:225-238_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Harris, Jeffrey H. & Schultz, Paul H., 1998. "The trading profits of SOES bandits," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 39-62, October.
    2. Thierry Foucault & Ailsa Röell & Patrik Sandås, 2003. "Market Making with Costly Monitoring: An Analysis of the SOES Controversy," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 345-384.
    3. Boulatov, Alex & Hatch, Brian C. & Johnson, Shane A. & Lei, Adam Y.C., 2009. "Dealer attention, the speed of quote adjustment to information, and net dealer revenue," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1531-1542, August.
    4. Thierry Foucalt & Ailsa Roell & Patrik Sandas, "undated". "Imperfect Market Monitoring and SOES Trading," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 15-99, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    5. Battalio, Robert H. & Mendenhall, Richard R., 2005. "Earnings expectations, investor trade size, and anomalous returns around earnings announcements," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 289-319, August.
    6. Chan, Kalok & Fong, Wai-Ming, 2000. "Trade size, order imbalance, and the volatility-volume relation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 247-273, August.
    7. Garvey, Ryan & Murphy, Anthony, 2005. "Entry, exit and trading profits: A look at the trading strategies of a proprietary trading team," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 629-649, December.
    8. Fong, Kingsley & Zurbruegg, Ralf, 2003. "How much do locals contribute to the price discovery process?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 305-320, May.
    9. Xing, Xuejing, 2004. "A note on the time-series relationship between market industry concentration and market volatility," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 105-115, April.
    10. Benston, George J. & Wood, Robert A., 2008. "Why effective spreads on NASDAQ were higher than on the New York stock exchange in the 1990s," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 17-40, January.
    11. Lee, Kuan-Hui & Wang, Shu-Feng, 2016. "Short-selling with a short wait: Trade- and account-level analyses in Korean stock market," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 209-222.
    12. Kandel, Eugene & M. Marx, Leslie, 1999. "Odd-eighth avoidance as a defense against SOES bandits," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 85-102, January.
    13. Loughran, Tim, 2007. "Geographic dissemination of information," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 675-694, December.
    14. Liao, Huei-Chu & Lee, Yi-Huey & Suen, Yu-Bo, 2008. "Electronic trading system and returns volatility in the oil futures market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2636-2644, September.
    15. Bacidore, Jeffrey M., 2001. "Decimalization, adverse selection, and market maker rents," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 829-855, May.

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