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Portfolio Serial Correlation and Nonsynchronous Trading

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  • Perry, Philip R.

Abstract

Common stock portfolios of large, heavily traded firms exhibit daily first-order serial correlation in excess of what would be expected, given the individual security coefficients. Further, this correlation rises as the number of securities in the portfolio increases. The direct implication of this finding is that nonsynchronous trading is not the only cause of correlation in daily market indices. Related implications are also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Perry, Philip R., 1985. "Portfolio Serial Correlation and Nonsynchronous Trading," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 517-523, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:20:y:1985:i:04:p:517-523_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Olbrys, 2013. "Price and Volatility Spillovers in the Case of Stock Markets Located in Different Time Zones," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(S2), pages 145-157, March.
    2. Chelley-Steeley, Patricia L. & Steeley, James M., 2014. "Portfolio size, non-trading frequency and portfolio return autocorrelation," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 56-77.
    3. Hurvich, Cliiford & Wang, Yi, 2006. "A Pure-Jump Transaction-Level Price Model Yielding Cointegration, Leverage, and Nonsynchronous Trading Effects," MPRA Paper 1413, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Yu, Chih-Hsien & Wu, Chunchi, 2001. "Economic sources of asymmetric cross-correlation among stock returns," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 19-40.
    5. Lang, Larry H. P. & Lee, Yi Tsung, 1999. "Performance of various transaction frequencies under call markets: The case of Taiwan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-39, February.
    6. Brooks, Chris & Hinich, Melvin J., 1999. "Cross-correlations and cross-bicorrelations in Sterling exchange rates," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 385-404, October.
    7. Olbryś Joanna, 2012. "Arch Effects in Multifactor Market-Timing Models of Polish Mutual Funds," Folia Oeconomica Stetinensia, De Gruyter Open, vol. 10(2), pages 60-80, January.
    8. Joanna Olbrys & Elzbieta Majewska, 2014. "Implications of market frictions: serial correlations in indexes on the emerging stock markets in Central and Eastern Europe," Operations Research and Decisions, Wroclaw University of Technology, Institute of Organization and Management, vol. 1, pages 51-70.
    9. Josep Garcia Blandón, 2001. "New findings regarding return autocorrelation anomalies and the importance of non-trading periods," Economics Working Papers 585, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    10. KUDRYAVTSEV Andrey, 2012. "Early To Rise: When Opening Stock Returns Are Higher Than Daily Returns?," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 7(3), pages 58-73, December.
    11. Andrey KUDRYAVTSEV, 2013. "Mechanism Of Autocorrelations Of Individual Stocks' Opening Returns," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 12, pages 37-56, June.
    12. Andrey Kudryavtsev, 2013. "Think About Tomorrow Morning: Opening Stock Returns May Show Reversals," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 16(50), pages 51-64, December.
    13. Roberto Ortiz & Mauricio Contreras & Marcelo Villena, 2015. "On the Efficient Market Hypothesis of Stock Market Indexes: The Role of Non-synchronous Trading and Portfolio Effects," Papers 1510.03926, arXiv.org.

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