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Law, Politics, and Financial Development: The Great Reversal of the U.K. Corporate Debt Market

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  • Coyle, Christopher
  • Turner, John D.

Abstract

This article examines the role of creditor protection in the development of the U.K. corporate bond market. This market grew rapidly in the late nineteenth century, but in the twentieth century it experienced a reversal, albeit with a short-lived post-1945 renaissance. Such was the extent of the reversal that the market from the 1970s onwards was smaller than it had been in 1870. We find that law does not explain the variation in the size of this market over time. Alternatively, our evidence suggests that inflation and taxation policies were major drivers of this market in the post-1945 era.

Suggested Citation

  • Coyle, Christopher & Turner, John D., 2013. "Law, Politics, and Financial Development: The Great Reversal of the U.K. Corporate Debt Market," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 810-846, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:73:y:2013:i:03:p:810-846_00
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    1. repec:eee:jfinin:v:37:y:2019:i:c:p:15-27 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Campbell, Gareth & Coyle, Christopher & Turner, John D., 2016. "This time is different: Causes and consequences of British banking instability over the long run," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 74-94.
    3. Turner, John D., 2014. "Financial history and financial economics," QUCEH Working Paper Series 14-03, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    4. Hannah, Leslie, 2017. "The London Stock Exchange 1869-1929: new bloody statistics for old?," Economic History Working Papers 82404, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    5. Acheson, Graeme G. & Campbell, Gareth & Turner, John D., 2015. "Who financed the expansion of the equity market? Shareholder clienteles in Victorian Britain," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-07, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    6. Acheson, Graeme G. & Coyle, Christopher & Jordan, David P. & Turner, John D., 2018. "Share trading activity and the rise of the rentier in the UK before 1920," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2018-04, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    7. repec:bla:ehsrev:v:71:y:2018:i:3:p:823-852 is not listed on IDEAS

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