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Determinants of household contributions to collective irrigation management: The case of the Doho Rice Scheme in Uganda




In order to explore the conditions for successful communal irrigation management, this study investigates the determinants of household contributions to the cleaning of irrigation channels and the availability of water. By using household-level data collected in a large-scale gravity irrigation scheme in Uganda, whose management was transferred from the government to the community, we find that household contributions to the cleaning of irrigation channels are determined by the scarcity of irrigation water, the opportunity cost of labor and the private benefit associated with plot size. We also find that the availability of irrigation water increases in the tertiary irrigation canal where the coefficient of variation of plot size is large, which may indicate that farmers of larger plots are particularly active in water management. These findings suggest that farmers are responsive to private benefits and, hence, the support of the government for communities to implement punishment may be effective for successful irrigation management.

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  • Nakano, Yuko & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2011. "Determinants of household contributions to collective irrigation management: The case of the Doho Rice Scheme in Uganda," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(05), pages 527-551, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:16:y:2011:i:05:p:527-551_00

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    Cited by:

    1. Millicent deGraft-Johnson & Aya Suzuki & Takeshi Sakurai & Keijiro Otsuka, 2014. "On the transferability of the Asian rice green revolution to rainfed areas in sub-Saharan Africa: an assessment of technology intervention in Northern Ghana," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(5), pages 555-570, September.
    2. Timothy N. Njeru & Yukichi Mano & Keijiro Otsuka, 2016. "Role of Access to Credit in Rice Production in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Mwea Irrigation Scheme in Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 25(2), pages 300-321.
    3. Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Presidential Address at 27th International Conference of Agricultural Economists, Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil : Food Insecurity, Income Inequality, and the Changing Comparative Advantage in World Agricultur," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 127068, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Joseph Kangile, Rajabu, 2015. "Efficiency in Production By Smallholder Rice Farmers Under Cooperative Irrigation Schemes in Pwani and Morogoro Regions, Tanzania," Research Theses 243447, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    5. Njagi, Njeru Timothy, 2012. "An Investigation into the Possibility of a Rice Green Revolution in Sub Saharan Africa: Lessons from the MWEA Irrigation Scheme in Kenya," Dissertations-Doctoral 207754, AgEcon Search.
    6. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.

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