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Who knows, who cares? The determinants of enactment, awareness, and compliance with community Natural Resource Management regulations in Uganda

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  • NKONYA, EPHRAIM
  • PENDER, JOHN
  • KATO, EDWARD

Abstract

At the community level, bylaws and other regulations are commonly used to manage natural resources. However, there is limited research on how communities enact these regulations and what determines awareness and compliance with these regulations. A survey of 273 communities was conducted in Uganda with an objective of analyzing the determinants of enactment, awareness and compliance with community Natural Resource Management (NRM) regulations. Presence in the community of programs and organizations with focus on agriculture and the environment increases the probability to enact and to be aware of NRM regulations. The probability to comply with regulations enacted by village councils was greater than the case with such regulations passed by higher legislative bodies, suggesting the important role played by decentralization in NRM. Poverty is associated with lower compliance with NRM regulations. This supports the poverty-natural resource degradation trap hypothesis, and suggests that measures to reduce poverty can also improve NRM.

Suggested Citation

  • Nkonya, Ephraim & Pender, John & Kato, Edward, 2008. "Who knows, who cares? The determinants of enactment, awareness, and compliance with community Natural Resource Management regulations in Uganda," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 79-101, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:13:y:2008:i:01:p:79-101_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Bashaasha, Bernard & Mangheni, Margaret Najjingo & Nkonya, Ephraim, 2011. "Decentralization and rural service delivery in Uganda:," IFPRI discussion papers 1063, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Akpalu, Wisdom & Eggert, Håkan & Vondolia, Godwin K., 2009. "Enforcement of exogenous environmental regulation, social disapproval and bribery," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 940-945, December.
    3. World Bank, 2010. "Sub-Saharan Africa - Managing Land in a Changing Climate : An Operational Perspective for Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2874, The World Bank.
    4. Nkonya, Ephraim & Markelova, Helen, 2009. "Looking beyond the obvious: Uncovering the features of natural resource conflicts in Uganda," CAPRi working papers 95, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Khundi, Fydess & Jagger, Pamela & Shively, Gerald & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2011. "Income, poverty and charcoal production in Uganda," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 199-205, March.

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