IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cpp/issued/v19y1993i3p279-297.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Employment Protection Laws: Policy Issues and Recent Research

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Kuhn

Abstract

Employment protection laws abound in the developed world; in Canada they primarily take the form of advance notice requirements of up to four months for layoffs. Recent research on the partial-equilibrium effects of such notice requirements reveals that they are effective in reducing the unemployment experienced by displaced workers; unfortunately however these effects dissipate rather quickly over time, implying that advance notice has little effect on long-term unemployment. Also, there appear to be few incremental gains to raising mandatory notice periods much beyond one month. Research on the general-equilibrium effects of employment protection laws on national employment, unemployment, and wage rates is much scarcer and at this point rather inconclusive. Interactions between employment protection laws and the unemployment insurance system are identified as an important topic for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kuhn, 1993. "Employment Protection Laws: Policy Issues and Recent Research," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(3), pages 279-297, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:19:y:1993:i:3:p:279-297
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0317-0861%28199309%2919%3A3%3C279%3AEPLPIA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-P
    Download Restriction: only available to JSTOR subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Peter Kuhn, "undated". "Canada and the "OECD Hypothesis": Does Labour Market Inflexibility Explain Canada's High Level of Unemployment?," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 10, McMaster University.
    2. Andreas Hornstein & Mingwei Yuan, 1999. "Can a Matching Model Explain the Long-Run Increase in Canada's Unemployment Rate?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(4), pages 878-905, August.
    3. Groenewold, Nicolaas, 1999. "Employment Protection and Aggregate Unemployment," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 619-630, July.
    4. Ben Tomlin, 2008. "Clearing Hurdles: Key Reforms to Make Small Business More Successful," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 264, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:19:y:1993:i:3:p:279-297. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler). General contact details of provider: http://economics.ca/cpp/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.