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The disintegrating Canadian labour market? The extent of the market then and now

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick Coe
  • J.C. Herbert Emery

Abstract

Analysis of real wages for three occupations in 13 Canadian cities for 1901-50 suggests Canada had a national labour market at least until 1950. However, analysis of real wages for 10 Canadian cities for 1971-2000 yields little evidence favouring integration of Canada's regional labour markets. The apparent lack of labour market integration reflects a weakness of an approach that assumes markets are in equilibrium. Unemployment rates after 1970 suggest that some regional markets may be characterized by excess labour supply. Analysis of relative provincial unemployment rates yields evidence consistent with local labour force adjustment to changing labour market conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Coe & J.C. Herbert Emery, 2004. "The disintegrating Canadian labour market? The extent of the market then and now," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 879-897, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:37:y:2004:i:4:p:879-897
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ross D. Hickey & David S. Jacks, 2011. "Nominal rigidities and retail price dispersion in Canada over the twentieth century," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(3), pages 749-780, August.
    2. J.C. Herbert Emery & Ronald D. Kneebone, 2008. "Socialists, Populists, Resources, and the Divergent Development of Alberta and Saskatchewan," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(4), pages 419-440, December.
    3. repec:eee:exehis:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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