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Pro-Business Local Governance and (Local) Business Associations: The Case of Gaziantep

Listed author(s):
  • Bayirbag Mustafa K.

    (Middle East Technical University, Department of Political Science and Public Administration)

Registered author(s):

    The article investigates how major changes in national economic policies, and in associated forms of state-business relations, produce pro-business local governance arrangements. It places the emphasis on the politics of state-business relations that revolve around the distribution of public resources. It aims to explain, in particular, how these dynamics unfold in the developing countries where neoliberal reforms are implemented under conditions of political instability and weak policy capacity of the state. The article focuses on the political mobilization of the local bourgeoisie through local business associations, as the major force behind the rise of pro-business local governance. It indicates that the emergent form a pro-business local governance scheme, especially when led by local business associations, will depend upon a) the degree of political autonomy of the local bourgeoisie from the national political actors (i.e, their distance to party politics); b) the composition of its constituency/supporters (or the class coalition behind it); c) the degree of their dependency on public resources. The arguments are elaborated in the case of the city of Gaziantep, Turkey.

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    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bap.2011.13.issue-4/1469-3569.1355/1469-3569.1355.xml?format=INT
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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Business and Politics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 1-39

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:buspol:v:13:y:2011:i:4:n:6
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    1. Mike Raco, 2003. "The Social Relations of Business Representation and Devolved Governance in the United Kingdom," Environment and Planning A, SAGE Publishing, vol. 35(10), pages 1853-1876, October.
    2. Brenner, Neil, 2004. "New State Spaces: Urban Governance and the Rescaling of Statehood," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199270064, December.
    3. Andrew Wood & David Valler & Peter North, 1998. "Local business representation and the private sector role in local economic policy in Britain," Local Economy, London South Bank University, vol. 13(1), pages 10-27, May.
    4. Cal Clark & Johnny Green & Keenan Grenell, 2001. "LOCAL REGIMES: Does Globalization Challenge the "Growth Machine"?," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 18(3), pages 49-62, 09.
    5. Allan Cochrane & Jamie Peck & Adam Tickell, 1996. "Manchester Plays Games: Exploring the Local Politics of Globalisation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 33(8), pages 1319-1336, October.
    6. Andrew Coulson, 1999. "Local Business Representation: Can We Afford TECs And Chambers?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 269-273.
    7. Mike Raco, 2003. "The social relations of business representation and devolved governance in the United Kingdom," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(10), pages 1853-1876, October.
    8. David Valler & Andrew Wood, 2004. "Devolution and the politics of business representation in Britain: a strategic - relational approach," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(10), pages 1835-1854, October.
    9. Schaede, Ulrike, 2000. "Cooperative Capitalism: Self-Regulation, Trade Associations, and the Antimonopoly Law in Japan," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198297185, December.
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