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A Herding Perspective on Global Games and Multiplicity

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  • Costain James S

    () (Bank of Spain)

Abstract

Recently, it has been claimed that full-information multiple equilibria in games with strategic complementarities are not robust, because generalizing to allow slightly heterogeneous information implies uniqueness. This paper argues that this "global games" uniqueness result is itself not robust. If we generalize by allowing most agents to observe a few previous actions before choosing, instead of forcing players to move exactly simultaneously, then multiplicity of outcomes is restored. Only a small sample of observations is needed to make our herding equilibrium behave like a full-information sunspot equilibrium instead of a global games equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Costain James S, 2007. "A Herding Perspective on Global Games and Multiplicity," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-55, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejtec:v:7:y:2007:i:1:n:22
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Cabrales & Rosemarie Nagel & Roc Armenter, 2007. "Equilibrium selection through incomplete information in coordination games: an experimental study," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(3), pages 221-234, September.
    2. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Friedman, Daniel, 2009. "Speculative attacks: A laboratory study in continuous time," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1064-1082, October.
    3. J. Daniel Aromí, 2013. "Pre-play Research in a Model of Bank Runs," Económica, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 59, pages 57-86, January-D.
    4. Rosa-García, Alfonso & Kiss, Hubert Janos, 2011. "Coordination structures," MPRA Paper 30463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Duffy, John & Ochs, Jack, 2012. "Equilibrium selection in static and dynamic entry games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 97-116.
    6. repec:pit:wpaper:376 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gergely Horváth & Hubert János Kiss, 2014. "Correlated observations, the law of small numbers and bank runs," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1429, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    8. Tai-kuang Ho & Ming-yen Wu, 2012. "Third-person Effect and Financial Contagion in the Context of a Global Game," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(5), pages 823-846, November.
    9. Monzón, Ignacio & Rapp, Michael, 2014. "Observational learning with position uncertainty," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 375-402.
    10. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1065 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:jmacro:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:135-146 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Schotter, Andrew & Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2009. "On the dynamics and severity of bank runs: An experimental study," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 217-241, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General

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