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Do People Value Racial Diversity? Evidence from Nielsen Ratings

Author

Listed:
  • Aldrich Eric M

    () (University of Washington)

  • Arcidiacono Peter S.

    () (Duke University)

  • Vigdor Jacob L

    () (Duke University)

Abstract

Nielsen ratings for ABC's Monday Night Football are significantly higher when the game involves a black quarterback. In this paper, we consider competing explanations for this effect. First, quarterback race might proxy for other player or team attributes. Second, black viewership patterns might be sensitive to quarterback race. Third, viewers of all races might be exhibiting a taste for diversity. We use both ratings data and evidence on racial attitudes from the General Social Survey to test these hypotheses empirically. The evidence strongly supports the taste-for-diversity hypothesis, while suggesting some role for black own-race preferences as well.

Suggested Citation

  • Aldrich Eric M & Arcidiacono Peter S. & Vigdor Jacob L, 2005. "Do People Value Racial Diversity? Evidence from Nielsen Ratings," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-24, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:topics.5:y:2005:i:1:n:4
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    Cited by:

    1. Myers Caitlin Knowles, 2008. "Discrimination as a Competitive Device: The Case of Local Television News," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-28, August.
    2. Melissa S. Kearney & Phillip B. Levine, 2015. "Media Influences on Social Outcomes: The Impact of MTV's 16 and Pregnant on Teen Childbearing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(12), pages 3597-3632, December.
    3. Florent Dubois & Christophe Muller, 2017. "Segregation and the Perception of the Minority," AMSE Working Papers 1718, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    4. Lee Jungmin, 2009. "American Idol: Evidence on Same-Race Preferences," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-21, July.
    5. Kevin Lang, 2015. "Racial Realism: A Review Essay on John Skrentny's After Civil Rights," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(2), pages 351-359, June.
    6. Anderson, Simon P & Waldfogel, Joel, 2015. "Preference Externalities in Media Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 10835, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Caruso, Raul & Addesa, Francesco & Di Domizio, Marco, 2016. "The Determinants Of The TV Demand Of Soccer: Empirical Evidence On Italian Serie A For The Period 2008-2015," MPRA Paper 70189, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Grimshaw Scott D. & Burwell Scott J., 2014. "Choosing the most popular NFL games in a local TV market," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-15, September.
    9. Grimshaw Scott D. & Sabin R. Paul & Willes Keith M., 2013. "Analysis of the NCAA Men’s Final Four TV audience," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 115-126, June.

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