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The Impact of Midwifery-Promoting Public Policies on Medical Interventions and Health Outcomes

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  • Miller Amalia R

    () (University of Virginia)

Abstract

This paper measures the impact of midwifery-promoting public policies on maternity care in the United States, using national Vital Statistics data on births spanning 1989-1999. State laws mandating insurance coverage of midwifery services are associated with an 18-percentage rise in midwife-attended births. The laws did not decrease rates of cesarean deliveries or lead to consistent effects on maternal mortality or Apgar scores. They did, however, lead to a statistically significant drop in neonatal deaths. Divergence between OLS and natural experiment estimates suggests that women are selecting into provider groups based on unobserved preferences and health.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller Amalia R, 2006. "The Impact of Midwifery-Promoting Public Policies on Medical Interventions and Health Outcomes," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-36, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:advances.6:y:2006:i:1:n:6
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    Cited by:

    1. Daysal, N. Meltem & Trandafir, Mircea & van Ewijk, Reyn, 2013. "Returns to Childbirth Technologies: Evidence from Preterm Births," IZA Discussion Papers 7834, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. N. Meltem Daysal & Mircea Trandafir & Reyn van Ewijk, 2015. "Saving Lives at Birth: The Impact of Home Births on Infant Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 28-50, July.
    3. Sara Markowitz & E. Kathleen Adams & Mary Jane Lewitt, PhD, CNM & Anne Dunlop, MD, 2016. "Competitive Effects of Scope of Practice Restrictions: Public Health or Public Harm?," NBER Working Papers 22780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Andrew Epstein & Jonathan D. Ketcham & Sean Nicholson, 2008. "Professional Partnerships and Matching in Obstetrics," NBER Working Papers 14070, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. repec:eee:jhecon:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:201-218 is not listed on IDEAS

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