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Explaining Public Support for the Environmental Movement: A Civic Voluntarism Model

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  • Steven E. Barkan

Abstract

The literature on environmentalism includes many more studies of environmental concern than of the public's practical support for the environmental movement. This article develops several categories of predictors of such support from the civic voluntarism model of Verba and associates. Copyright (c) 2004 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven E. Barkan, 2004. "Explaining Public Support for the Environmental Movement: A Civic Voluntarism Model," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(4), pages 913-937.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:85:y:2004:i:4:p:913-937
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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Babcicky, 2013. "Rethinking the Foundations of Sustainability Measurement: The Limitations of the Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI)," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 133-157, August.
    2. Franz Hackl & Martin Halla & Gerald J Pruckner, 2005. "Coasian payments for agricultural external benefits - an empirical cross-section analysis," Economics working papers 2005-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Christopher Raymond & Gregory Brown, 2011. "Assessing spatial associations between perceptions of landscape value and climate change risk for use in climate change planning," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(3), pages 653-678, February.
    4. Lenahan O'Connell, 2008. "Exploring the Social Roots of Smart Growth Policy Adoption by Cities," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1356-1372.
    5. García-Valiñas, María A. & Macintyre, Alison & Torgler, Benno, 2012. "Volunteering, pro-environmental attitudes and norms," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 455-467.

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