IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reviec/v4y1996i3p364-70.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Time-Series Support for Balassa's Productivity-Bias Hypothesis: Evidence from Korea

Author

Listed:
  • Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen
  • Rhee, Hyun-Jae

Abstract

In this paper we use the Johansen and Juselius cointegration technique and quarterly data over the period 1979-1993 to test the productivity-bias hypothesis between Korea and four of its major trading partners (Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). The results show that in all four cases the deviation of purchasing-power parity (PPP) from the equilibrium exchange rate has a long-run relationship with the productivity ratios, supporting the notion that as Korea becomes relatively more productive, the Korean won appreciates in real terms. Copyright 1996 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Rhee, Hyun-Jae, 1996. "Time-Series Support for Balassa's Productivity-Bias Hypothesis: Evidence from Korea," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 364-370, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:4:y:1996:i:3:p:364-70
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Brock, Philip L., 2011. "The Penn-Balassa-Samuelson effect through the lens of the dependent economy model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 1547-1556, September.
    2. Chinn, Menzie D., 2000. "Before the fall: were East Asian currencies overvalued?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 101-126, September.
    3. Predrag Petrovic, 2012. "Harrod Balassa Samuelson effect and the role of distribution sector: an empirical case study of Serbia and EMU," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 57-87.
    4. Chinn, Menzie D, 1999. "On the Won and Other East Asian Currencies," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(2), pages 113-127, April.
    5. Taylor Mark P. & Sarno Lucio, 2001. "Real Exchange Rate Dynamics in Transition Economies: A Nonlinear Analysis," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(3), pages 1-26, October.
    6. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Gelan, Abera, 2006. "Black market exchange rate and the productivity bias hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 243-249, May.
    7. Imed Drine & Christophe Rault, 2005. "Can the Balassa-Samuelson theory explain long-run real exchange rate movements in OECD countries?," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(8), pages 519-530.
    8. Charalambos Pattichis & Mona Kanaan, 2004. "The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis and Oil Price Shocks in a Small Open Economy: Evidence from Cyprus," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 45-56, January.
    9. Azali, M. & Habibullah, M. S. & Baharumshah, A. Z., 2001. "Does PPP hold between Asian and Japanese economies? Evidence using panel unit root and panel cointegration," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 35-50, January.
    10. Josip Tica & Ivo Družić, 2006. "The Harrod-Balassa-Samuelson Effect: A Survey of Empirical Evidence," EFZG Working Papers Series 0607, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb.
    11. Ericsson, Johan & Irandoust, Manuchehr, 2004. "The productivity-bias hypothesis and the PPP theorem: new evidence from panel vector autoregressive models," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 121-138, April.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:4:y:1996:i:3:p:364-70. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0965-7576 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.