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Homeownership Determinants for Chinese Americans: Assimilation, Ethnic Concentration and Nativity

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  • Gary Painter
  • Lihong Yang
  • Zhou Yu

Abstract

Chinese homeownership rates in the Los Angeles Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area adjusted by socioeconomic and housing market characteristics are, on average, 18 percentage points higher than those of native white households. This finding runs contrary to most immigration literature, which suggests that immigrants usually lag behind the host society in measures of economic well-being. This study focuses on two additional factors, which most economic studies of homeownership choice ignore, that may play a role in helping Chinese households achieve high homeownership in ways that other immigrant groups do not. The results of this analysis find that the high homeownership rates cannot be explained by the English skills of households. The cultural influence of homeowning peers may have partially contributed to the higher homeownership of Chinese households. While living in ethnic Chinese communities lowers homeownership rates, in general, it helps improve the likelihood that Chinese immigrants will own a home. Finally, we find that there is great diversity among Chinese subgroups with respect to their likelihood of owning a home, but very little diversity with respect to the education and income level of Chinese households across subgroups. Copyright 2004 by the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association

Suggested Citation

  • Gary Painter & Lihong Yang & Zhou Yu, 2004. "Homeownership Determinants for Chinese Americans: Assimilation, Ethnic Concentration and Nativity," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 32(3), pages 509-539, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:32:y:2004:i:3:p:509-539
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    Cited by:

    1. Coulson, N. Edward & Dalton, Maurice, 2010. "Temporal and ethnic decompositions of homeownership rates: Synthetic cohorts across five censuses," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 155-166, September.
    2. Amelie F. Constant & Rowan Roberts & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2009. "Ethnic Identity and Immigrant Homeownership," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 46(9), pages 1879-1898, August.
    3. Zorlu, Aslan & Mulder, Clara H. & van Gaalen, Ruben, 2014. "Ethnic disparities in the transition to home ownership," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, pages 151-163.
    4. Brad R. Humphreys & Adam Nowak & Yang Zhou, 2016. "Cultural Superstitions and Residential Real Estate Prices: Transaction-level Evidence from the US Housing Market," Working Papers 16-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    5. Richard M. Todd & Michael Grover, 2008. "Accounting for regional migration patterns and homeownership disparities in the Hmong-American refugee community, 1980-2000," Community Affairs Report 2008-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    6. Uzi Rebhun, 2009. "Housing Adjustment Among Immigrants in Israel: Application of Complementary Non-Metric and Metric Techniques," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, pages 565-590.
    7. Chakrabarty, Durba & Osei, Michael J. & Winters, John V. & Zhao, Danyang, 2017. "Are Immigrant and Minority Homeownership Rates Gaining Ground in the US?," IZA Discussion Papers 10852, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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