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The Limitations of 'Policy Transfer' and 'Lesson Drawing' for Public Policy Research


  • Oliver James
  • Martin Lodge


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  • Oliver James & Martin Lodge, 2003. "The Limitations of 'Policy Transfer' and 'Lesson Drawing' for Public Policy Research," Political Studies Review, Political Studies Association, vol. 1(2), pages 179-193.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pstrev:v:1:y:2003:i:2:p:179-193

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. André Decoster & Jason Loughrey & Cathal O'Donoghue & Dirk Verwerft, 2010. "How regressive are indirect taxes? A microsimulation analysis for five European countries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 326-350.
    2. Mike Brewer & James Browne & Andrew Hood & Robert Joyce & Luke Sibieta, 2013. "The Short‐ and Medium‐Term Impacts of the Recession on the UK Income Distribution," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 179-201, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zahid Sobaci, 2009. "Regional Development Agencies in Turkey: Are They Examples of Obligated Policy Transfer?," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 51-65, March.
    2. Cabral, Lídia & Favareto, Arilson & Mukwereza, Langton & Amanor, Kojo, 2016. "Brazil’s Agricultural Politics in Africa: More Food International and the Disputed Meanings of “Family Farming”," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 47-60.
    3. Martin de Jong & Jurian Edelenbos, 2012. "Knowledge Exchange in Trans-national City Networks: Evolutionary Mechanisms in Cross-local Learning Among European Cities," Chapters,in: Creative Knowledge Cities, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis Ch. & Florax, Raymond J.G.M. & Labi, Samuel & Karlaftis, Mathew G., 2010. "Contracting in highway maintenance and rehabilitation: Are spatial effects important?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 136-146, March.
    5. Atalay, Yasemin & Biermann, Frank & Kalfagianni, Agni, 2016. "Adoption of renewable energy technologies in oil-rich countries: Explaining policy variation in the Gulf Cooperation Council states," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 206-214.
    6. Timms, Paul, 2011. "Urban transport policy transfer: "bottom-up" and "top-down" perspectives," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 513-521, May.

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