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Advantage through Training in Poland? A Microeconometric Evaluation of the Employment Effects of Training and Job Subsidy Programmes


  • Patrick A . Puhani


I estimate the employment effects of publicly financed training and intervention works (subsidized employment) programmes in Poland. The analysis is based on the Polish Labour Force Survey (PLFS). Two widely applied approaches to identify causal effects are used. The results are qualitatively invariant with respect to the applied methodology. I find some evidence that training improves the employment opportunities of both men and women, whereas intervention works do not. Previous findings using PLFS data thus seem to be robust. The contrary view expressed by other authors on intervention works (subsidized employment) is likely to stem from the different data source (on only some Polish regions and with fewer control variables) used by them and does not seem to be related to the estimation strategy. Copyright Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick A . Puhani, 2002. "Advantage through Training in Poland? A Microeconometric Evaluation of the Employment Effects of Training and Job Subsidy Programmes," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 16(3), pages 569-608, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:16:y:2002:i:3:p:569-608

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    2. Tor Jacobson & Henry Ohlsson, 2000. "Working time, employment, and work sharing: Evidence from Sweden," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 169-187.
    3. Jennifer Hunt, 1998. "Hours Reductions as Work-Sharing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(1), pages 339-381.
    4. John M. Evans & Douglas C. Lippoldt & Pascal Marianna, 2001. "Trends in Working Hours in OECD Countries," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 45, OECD Publishing.
    5. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501, June.
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    1. repec:eee:labeco:v:47:y:2017:i:c:p:182-201 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bergemann, Annette & Pohlan, Laura & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2017. "The impact of participation in job creation schemes in turbulent times," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 182-201.
    3. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2008. "On the Failure of the Bootstrap for Matching Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1537-1557, November.
    4. Bergemann, Annette & Pohlan, Laura & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2016. "Job Creation Schemes in Turbulent Times," IZA Discussion Papers 10369, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kluve, Jochen & Fertig, Michael & Jacobi, Lena & Nima, Leonhard & Schaffner, Sandra & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Card, David & Góra, Marek & Jensen, Peter & Leetmaa, Reelika & Patacchini, Eleonora & van , 2005. "Study on the effectiveness of ALMPs: Research project for the European Commission, DG Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities. Final report," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 69929.
    6. Holger Bonin & Ulf Rinne, 2014. "‘Beautiful Serbia’ - objective and subjective outcomes of active labour market policy in a transition economy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(1), pages 43-67, January.

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