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The Management of Redundancies in Europe: The Case of Great Britain

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  • Simon Deakin
  • Frank Wilkinson

Abstract

The paper presents the findings of a comparative and interdisciplinary legal and economic study on managing labour redundancies in seven EU member countries. It is structured for immediate comparability between the systems examined. The introductory section contains an account of the evolution of the British labour market, with special reference to redundancy trends, the features of the programmes for managing redundancies, the roles of firms and the 'external environment' in handling workforce adjustments. The second section presents a map of policies that work to prevent labour redundancies (preventive measures) such as flexibility, training etc. Next, the instruments for handling temporary labour redundancies (retentive measures) are examined (e.g. short-time working, temporary layoffs etc.). The following section is devoted to instruments and programmes involved in the management of permanent labour redundancies (expulsive measures), e.g. collective dismissals, severance pay etc. The final section provides an overall assessment of the British system for managing labour redundancies, and briefly discusses the national debate on the prospects for reform, in light of the principles and policies of convergence set forth by the European Union. Copyright Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Deakin & Frank Wilkinson, 1999. "The Management of Redundancies in Europe: The Case of Great Britain," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 13(1), pages 41-89, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:13:y:1999:i:1:p:41-89
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    Cited by:

    1. Simon Deakin & Hannah Reed, 1999. "Transcending the Flexibility Debate? Deregulation and Employment in Britain 1979-1997," Working Papers wp132, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. Miguel Malo & Joaquín Pérez, 2003. "Individual Dismissals in Europe and the United States: A Model on the Influence of the Legal Framework on Firing Costs," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 47-63, January.
    3. Armour, John & Deakin, Simon, 2002. "Insolvency and employment protection: the mixed effects of the Acquired Rights Directive," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 443-463, December.
    4. Simon Deakin & Giles Slinger, 1999. "Company Law as an Instrument of Inclusion: Re-regulating Stakeholder Relations in the Context of Takeovers," Working Papers wp145, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.

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