IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ehsrev/v48y1995i2p238-257.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Population, money supply, and the velocity of circulation in England, 1300–1700

Author

Listed:
  • N. J. MAYHEW

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • N. J. Mayhew, 1995. "Population, money supply, and the velocity of circulation in England, 1300–1700," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 48(2), pages 238-257, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:48:y:1995:i:2:p:238-257
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1995.tb01417.x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Edo, Anthony & Melitz, Jacques, 2019. "The Primary Cause of European Inflation in 1500-1700: Precious Metals or Population? The English Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 14023, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Palma, Nuno, 2018. "Money and modernization in early modern England," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(3), pages 231-261, December.
    3. Edvinsson, Rodney, 2012. "The international political economy of early modern copper mercantilism: Rent seeking and copper money in Sweden 1624–1776," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 303-315.
    4. repec:cpr:ceprdp:14089 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chilosi, David & Volckart, Oliver, 2010. "Good or bad money?: debasement, society and the state in the late Middle Ages," Economic History Working Papers 27946, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    6. Yi Xu & Zhihong Shi & Bas Leeuwen & Yuping Ni & Zipeng Zhang & Ye Ma, 2017. "Chinese National Income, ca. 1661–1933," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 57(3), pages 368-393, November.
    7. Paul Slack, 2009. "Material progress and the challenge of affluence in seventeenth‐century England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(3), pages 576-603, August.
    8. repec:bla:ehsrev:v:71:y:2018:i:2:p:373-392 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Stephen H. Rigby, 2010. "Urban population in late medieval England: the evidence of the lay subsidies," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 393-417, May.
    10. Adam Brzezinski & Yao Chen & Nuno Palma & Felix Ward, 2019. "The vagaries of the sea: evidence on the real effects of money from maritime disasters in the Spanish Empire," Working Papers 0170, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    11. Jeremy Edwards & Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2018. "Did the Black Death Cause Economic Development by "Inventing" Fertility Restriction?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7016, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Santiago de Miguel Salanova, 2019. "Class, education and social mobility: Madrid, 1880-1905," Working Papers 0146, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    13. Baomin Dong & Jiong Gong, 2014. "Velocity of Money and Economic Development in Medieval China: The case of Northern Song," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 203-217, May.
    14. repec:bla:ehsrev:v:71:y:2018:i:4:p:1147-1172 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:48:y:1995:i:2:p:238-257. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ehsukea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.