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Non-timber Values and the Optimal Forest Rotation: An Application to the Southern Forest of Tasmania




The present paper examines the optimal use of a site containing standing timber, taking account of both timber and non-timber values. Using a site in the southern forest of Tasmania for illustrative purposes, it calculates the relationships between age of stand, extent of timber and non-timber values and optimal cutting age. It finds that, for a stand with moderate potential environmental benefits, there is a period of its life during which it is optimal to log. This segment narrows, and eventually disappears, as potential environmental benefits increase. Copyright © 2004 Economic Society of Australia..

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  • Harry F. Campbell & Sarah M. Jennings, 2004. "Non-timber Values and the Optimal Forest Rotation: An Application to the Southern Forest of Tasmania," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(251), pages 387-393, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:80:y:2004:i:251:p:387-393

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Jenny Corbett & David Vines, 1999. "Asian Currency and Financial Crises: Lessons from Vulnerability, Crisis and Collapse," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 155-177, March.
    8. Falvey, R. & Tyers, R. & McDougall, R., 1997. "Trade Shocks and the Magnitude of Transmitted Wage Adjustments," Papers 318, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
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