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Strengthening Public Safety Nets from the Bottom Up

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  • Jonathan Morduch
  • Manohar Sharma

Abstract

Helping to reduce vulnerability poses a new set of challenges for public policy. A starting point is understanding the ways in which communities and extended families try to cope with difficulties in the absence of public interventions. Coping mechanisms range from the informal exchange of transfers and loans to more structured institutions that enable an entire community to provide protection to its neediest members. This article describes ways of building public safety nets to complement and extend informal and private institutions. The most effective policies will combine transfer systems that are sensitive to existing mechanisms with new institutions for providing insurance and credit and for generating savings.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Morduch & Manohar Sharma, 2002. "Strengthening Public Safety Nets from the Bottom Up," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 20(5), pages 569-588, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devpol:v:20:y:2002:i:5:p:569-588
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-7679.00190
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    Cited by:

    1. Jann Goedecke & Isabelle Guérin & Bert D'Espallier & Govindan Venkatasubramanian, 2018. "Why do financial inclusion policies fail in mobilizing savings from the poor? Lessons from rural south India," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 36(S1), pages 201-219, March.

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