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The Impact of Microelectronics on Developing Countries: The Case of Brazilian Telecommunications

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  • Michael Hobday

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  • Michael Hobday, 1985. "The Impact of Microelectronics on Developing Countries: The Case of Brazilian Telecommunications," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 313-340, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:devchg:v:16:y:1985:i:2:p:313-340
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7660.1985.tb00212.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hardy, Andrew P., 1980. "The role of the telephone in economic development," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 278-286, December.
    2. Wellenius, Björn, 1977. "Telecommunications in developing countries," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(4), pages 289-297, September.
    3. Newfarmer, Richard S., 1979. "TNC takeovers in Brazil: The uneven distribution of benefits in the market for firms," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 25-43, January.
    4. Clippinger, John H., 1977. "Can communications development benefit the Third World?," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(4), pages 298-304, September.
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