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Classical Surplus Theory and Heterodox Economics

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  • Nuno Ornelas Martins

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  • Nuno Ornelas Martins, 2013. "Classical Surplus Theory and Heterodox Economics," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(5), pages 1205-1231, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajecsc:v:72:y:2013:i:5:p:1205-1231
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ajes.12045
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Avi J. Cohen, 2003. "Retrospectives: Whatever Happened to the Cambridge Capital Theory Controversies?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 199-214, Winter.
    2. Lee, Frederic, 2011. "Heterodox surplus approach: production, prices, and value theory," MPRA Paper 31824, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Frederic Lee & Tae-Hee Jo, 2011. "Social Surplus Approach and Heterodox Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 857-876.
    4. Vivian Walsh, 2008. "Freedom, Values and Sen: Towards a Morally Enriched Classical Economic Theory," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 199-232.
    5. Amartya Sen, 2003. "Sraffa, Wittgenstein, and Gramsci," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1240-1255, December.
    6. Sheila C. Dow, 2008. "Plurality in Orthodox and Heterodox Economics," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 73-96, March.
    7. Tony Lawson, 2006. "The nature of heterodox economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(4), pages 483-505, July.
    8. Vivian Walsh, 2003. "Sen after Putnam," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 315-394.
    9. Ronald L. Meek, 1961. "Mr. Sraffa'S Rehabilitation Of Classical Economics1," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 8(2), pages 119-136, June.
    10. John Davis, 2002. "Gramsci, Sraffa, Wittgenstein: philosophical linkages," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 384-401.
    11. Luigi L. Pasinetti, 2005. "The Cambridge School of Keynesian Economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 837-848, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Artner, Annamária, 2015. "Szűkösség és felesleg a történelemben és a tudományban
      [Surplus and scarcity in history and science]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(1), pages 78-105.

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