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Minimum-data analysis of ecosystem service supply in semi-subsistence agricultural systems

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  • John M. Antle
  • Bocar Diagana
  • Jetse J. Stoorvogel
  • Roberto O. Valdivia

Abstract

Antle and Valdivia (2006, Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 50, 1-15) proposed a minimum-data (MD) approach to simulate ecosystem service supply curves that can be implemented using readily available secondary data and validated the approach in a case study of soil carbon sequestration in a monoculture wheat system. However, many applications of the MD approach are in developing countries where semi-subsistence systems with multiple production activities are being used and data availability is limited. This paper discusses how MD analysis can be applied to more complex production systems such as semi-subsistence systems with multiple production activities and presents validation analysis for studies of soil carbon sequestration in semi-subsistence farming systems in Kenya and Senegal. Results from these two studies confirm that ecosystem service supply curves based on the MD approach are close approximations to the curves derived from highly detailed data and models and are therefore sufficiently accurate and robust to be used to support policy decision making. Copyright 2010 The Authors. AJARE 2010 Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society Inc. and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. Antle & Bocar Diagana & Jetse J. Stoorvogel & Roberto O. Valdivia, 2010. "Minimum-data analysis of ecosystem service supply in semi-subsistence agricultural systems," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(4), pages 601-617, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajarec:v:54:y:2010:i:4:p:601-617
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8489.2010.00511.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. GR Pautsch & LA Kurkalova & BA Babcock & CL Kling, 2001. "The Efficiency Of Sequestering Carbon In Agricultural Soils," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(2), pages 123-134, April.
    2. JunJie Wu & Richard M. Adams & Catherine L. Kling & Katsuya Tanaka, 2004. "From Microlevel Decisions to Landscape Changes: An Assessment of Agricultural Conservation Policies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 26-41.
    3. Antle, John M. & Stoorvogel, Jetse J., 2008. "Agricultural carbon sequestration, poverty, and sustainability," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(03), pages 327-352, June.
    4. Lubowski, Ruben N. & Plantinga, Andrew J. & Stavins, Robert N., 2006. "Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 135-152, March.
    5. Antle, John & Capalbo, Susan & Mooney, Sian & Elliott, Edward & Paustian, Keith, 2003. "Spatial heterogeneity, contract design, and the efficiency of carbon sequestration policies for agriculture," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 231-250, September.
    6. Diagana, Bocar & Antle, John & Stoorvogel, Jetse & Gray, Kara, 2007. "Economic potential for soil carbon sequestration in the Nioro region of Senegal's Peanut Basin," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 26-37, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Skidmore, Samuel & Santos, Paulo & Leimona, Beria, 2014. "Targeting REDD+: An Empirical Analysis of Carbon Sequestration in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 781-790.
    2. Shikuku, Kelvin M. & Valdivia, Roberto O. & Paul, Birthe K. & Mwongera, Caroline & Winowiecki, Leigh & L├Ąderach, Peter & Herrero, Mario & Silvestri, Silvia, 2017. "Prioritizing climate-smart livestock technologies in rural Tanzania: A minimum data approach," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 204-216.
    3. Valdivia, Roberto O. & Antle, John M. & Stoorvogel, Jetse J., 2012. "Coupling the Tradeoff Analysis Model with a market equilibrium model to analyze economic and environmental outcomes of agricultural production systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 17-29.

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