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The Effects of Recent Relative Price Movements on the Canadian Economy




Although the standard of living of Canadians has improved as a result of terms-of-trade gains created by the sharp rise in real commodity prices over the past five years or so, the commodity-price increase, combined with an exchange rate appreciation and real income gain, triggered structural adjustments by altering underlying economic incentives. The frictions generated in adjusting to the relative price shock have likely contributed to hold back aggregate productivity growth. Dupuis and Marcil examine the structural adjustments that have been required-in particular, the resource reallocation among the different sectors of the economy-and its effects on employment, output, and productivity, as well as the responses of final domestic demand and external trade flows.

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  • David Dupuis & Philippe Marcil, 2008. "The Effects of Recent Relative Price Movements on the Canadian Economy," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2008(Autumn), pages 45-55.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2008:y:2008:i:autumn08:p:45-55

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Macdonald, Ryan, 2007. "Canadian and U.S. Real Income Growth Pre and Post 2000: A Reversal of Fortunes," Economic Analysis (EA) Research Paper Series 2007048e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Gerard A. Pfann, 1996. "Adjustment Costs in Factor Demand," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 1264-1292, September.
    4. Jeannine Bailliu & Michael R. King, 2005. "What Drives Movements in Exchange Rates?," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2005(Autumn), pages 27-39.
    5. Robert Lafrance & Lawrence L. Schembri, 2000. "The Exchange Rate, Productivity, and the Standard of Living," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1999(Winter), pages 17-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shutao Cao & Danny Leung, 2010. "Labour Reallocation, Relative Prices and Productivity," Staff Working Papers 10-2, Bank of Canada.
    2. Evan Capeluck, 2015. "Explanations of the Decline in Manufacturing Employment in Canada," CSLS Research Reports 2015-17, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

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